Etymology
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magnolia (n.)

plant genus indigenous to subtropical Asia and eastern North America, very ornamental and frequently cultivated, 1748, named by Plumier from Magnolius, Latinized name of Pierre Magnol (1638-1715), French physician and botanist, professor of botany at Montpellier, who devised the systematic classification of plants, + abstract noun ending -ia. As the name of the pale pink color of magnolia blossoms, by 1931.

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steatopygia (n.)
"abnormal accumulation of fat on the buttocks of certain races," 1822, Modern Latin, from steato- "fat, tallow," combining form of Greek stear (genitive steatos) "solid fat, suet" (see stearin) + Greek pyge "rump, buttocks" + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Steatopygous "having enormously fat buttocks" [Century Dictionary]; steatopygy.
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amblyopia (n.)

1706, "weakening of the eyesight without any apparent defect in the eyes," medical Latin, from Greek amblyopia "dim-sightedness," noun of action from amblys "dulled, blunt" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *mel- (1) "soft") + ōps "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see") + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Amblyopic.

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aphonia (n.)
in pathology, "want of voice, loss of voice through some physical condition," 1778, from medical Latin aphonia, from Greek aphonia "speechlessness," abstract noun from aphonos "voiceless," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + phone "voice," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say" + abstract noun ending (see -ia). Englished form aphony is attested from 1680s.
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fuchsia (n.)
red color (like that of the Fuchsia flowers), 1921, from the ornamental shrub (named 1703 by French botanist Charles Plumier; by 1753 in English), from the Latinized name of German botanist Leonhard Fuchs (1501-1566) + abstract noun ending -ia. The German surname is literally "fox." Not related to Latin fucus "seaweed, sea wrack, tangle" (see fucus) which also gave its name to a red color prepared from it.
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pyrexia (n.)

"fever, a higher bodily temperature than is normal," 1769, medical Latin, from Greek pyrexis "feverishness," from pyressein "to be feverish, to be ill of fever," from pyretos "fever, burning heat" (related to pyr "fire," from PIE root *paewr- "fire") + abstract noun ending -ia. Formerly sometimes nativized as pyrexy. Related: Pyrexial; pyrexic; pyrexical.

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hysteria (n.)
nervous disease, 1801, coined in medical Latin as an abstract noun from Greek hystera "womb," from PIE *udtero-, variant of *udero- "abdomen, womb, stomach" (see uterus). Originally defined as a neurotic condition peculiar to women and thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the uterus. With abstract noun ending -ia. General sense of "unhealthy emotion or excitement" is by 1839.
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anorexia (n.)
1590s, "morbid want of appetite," Modern Latin, from Greek anorexia, from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + orexis "appetite, desire," from oregein "to desire, long for," literally "reach out (one's hand), stretch oneself, stretch out for" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line") + abstract noun ending -ia. In current use, often short for anorexia nervosa.
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synaesthesia (n.)

also synesthesia, "sensation in one part of the body produced by stimulus in another," 1881, in some cases via French, from Modern Latin, from Greek syn- "together" (see syn-) + aisthēsis "feeling" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive") + abstract noun ending -ia. Also psychologically, of the senses (colors that seem to the perceiver to having odor, etc.), from 1891. Related: Synaesthetic (adj.).

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polyandria (n.)

1751 in botany, in reference to a class of flowers having 20 or more stamens; 1809 of human relationships (implied in polyandrian), from poly- "many" andr-, stem of aner "man, husband" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man"), which is used in botany to mean "stamen, having stamens," + -ia "condition of." Late Greek polyandria meant "populousness," a polyandrion was "place where many assemble." Related: Polyandric.

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