Etymology
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rotter (n.)

"person deemed objectionable on moral grounds," 1889, slang, from rot (v.) + -er (3).

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insider (n.)
"one in possession of special information by virtue of being within some organization," 1848, from inside (n.) + -er (1). Originally in reference to the stock markets.
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freezer (n.)
1847 as the name of a type of large tin can used in ice-cream manufacture; from freeze (v.) + -er (1). As a household appliance, from 1945. Freezer burn attested from 1929.
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Highlander (n.)
1630s, from Highland + -er (1). Compare Dutch hooglander, German Hochländer.
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gunner (n.)
mid-14c., gonner "one who works a cannon, catapult, or mangonel," from gun (n.) + -er (1).
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hustler (n.)
1825, "thief" (especially one who roughs up his victims), from hustle (v.) + -er (1). Sense of "one who is energetic in work or business" (especially, but not originally, a salesman) is from 1884; sense of "prostitute" dates from 1924.
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giver (n.)
mid-14c., from give (v.) + -er (1). Old English agent-noun forms were giefend, giefa.
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wharfinger (n.)
"operator or manager of a wharf," 1550s, from wharfage "provision or accommodation at wharves" (mid-15c.), from wharf + agent noun suffix -er (1) + unetymological -n- as in messenger.
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goner (n.)
"something dead or about to die, person past recovery, one who is done for in any way," 1836, American English colloquial, from gone + -er (1). From earlier expressions such as gone goose (1830), gone coon, etc.
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geographer (n.)
"one versed in geography," 1540s, from geography + agent noun ending -er (1). The Greek word was geographos (Medieval Latin geographus).
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