Etymology
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saveloy (n.)
1837, corruption of French cervelas, from Italian cervellata, from cervello "brain," from Latin cerebrum (see cerebral). So called because it originally was made of pigs' brains.
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saver (n.)
c. 1300, "savior," agent noun from save (v.). Meaning "one who economizes" is 1540s; meaning "means of saving" is from 1660s.
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Saville Row 

also Savile Row, fashionable street in London, noted for its tailors' shops since at least 1870; hence, metonymically,  "fashionable tailoring," by 1893. The street name itself dates to mid-18c. and is names for the aristocratic family that formerly had an estate nearby. It was a fashionable neighborhood early 19c., which might have attracted the tailors.

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saving (prep.)
late 14c., from safe (adj.); see save (prep.).
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savings (n.)
"money saved," 1737, plural of saving, vwerbal noun from save (v.). Related: Savings account attested by 1882; savings bank, 1817. S & L for savings and loan attested from 1951.
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savior (n.)
c. 1300, "one who delivers or rescues from peril," also a title of Jesus Christ, from Old French sauveour, from Late Latin salvatorem (nominative salvator) "a saver, preserver" (source also of Spanish salvador, Italian salvatore), from salvatus, past participle of salvare "to save" (see save (v.)). In Christian sense, a translation of Greek soter "savior." Replaced Old English hælend, literally "healing," noun use of present participle of hælan (see heal).
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saviour (n.)
chiefly British English spelling of savior (q.v.); for suffix, see -or.
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savoir-faire (n.)
"instinctive knowledge of the right course of action in any circumstance," 1815, from French, literally "to know (how) to do," from savoir "to know" (from Latin sapere; see sapient) + faire (from Latin facere "to make, do;" from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). French also has savoir-vivre "ability in good society; knowledge of customs in the world."
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Savonarola 
Girolamo Savonarola (1452-1498), Dominican monk famous for his fierce opposition to moral licence and Church corruption.
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savor (n.)
mid-13c., from Old French savor "flavor, taste; sauce, seasoning; delight, pleasure," from Latin saporem (nominative sapor) "taste, flavor," related to sapere "to have a flavor" (see sapient).
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