Etymology
Advertisement
Sauk (1)

a native people of what is now the U.S. Midwest, 1722, an alternative writing of Sac (q.v.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Sauk (2)

southern Coastal Salishan group of Native Americans, from a native Lushootseed name, probably folk-etymologized by influence of Sauk (1).

Related entries & more 
Saul 

masc. proper name, Biblical first king of Israel, from Latin Saul, from Hebrew Shaul, literally "asked for," passive participle of sha'al "he asked for."

Related entries & more 
sault (n.)

"waterfall or rapid," c. 1600 (Hakluyt, in an account from Canada), from colonial French sault, 17c. alternative spelling of saut "to leap," from Latin saltus, from salire "to leap" (see salient (adj.)). Middle English sault, borrowed from Old French, was "a leap; an assault."

Related entries & more 
sauna (n.)

"Finnish steam bath," also the house or room where it is taken, 1881, from Finnish sauna. Originally in a Finnish context; by 1959 in reference to installation in homes and gyms outside Finland.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
saunter (n.)

"a leisurely stroll, a ramble," 1828, from saunter (v.). Earlier it meant "idle occupation, diversion" (1728); "leisurely, careless way of walking" (1712).

Related entries & more 
saunter (v.)

c. 1500, santren "to muse, be in reverie," a word of uncertain origin. The meaning "walk with a leisurely gait" is from 1660s, and may be a different word which, despite many absurd speculations, also is of unknown origin. Klein prints the theory (held by Skeat and Murray) that this sense of the word derives via Anglo-French sauntrer (mid-14c.) from French s'aventurer "to take risks." Century Dictionary finds the theory involves difficulties but "it is the only one that has any plausibility," but OED finds it "unlikely." Also see here. Related: Sauntered; saunterer; sauntering.

Related entries & more 
saurian (n.)

reptile of the order Sauria, 1819, from Modern Latin Sauria "the order of reptiles" (Brongniart, 1799), from Greek sauros "lizard" (see -saurus). As an adjective, "belonging to the Sauria," by 1829.

Sauropod for the suborder of the big plant-eating dinosaurs is by 1891, from Modern Latin sauropoda (Marsh, 1884), second element from Greek pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Sauroid (n.) "a saurian animal" is by 1836, also as an adjective.

Related entries & more 
-saurus 

element used in forming dinosaur names, from Latinized form of Greek sauros "lizard," a word of unknown origin; possibly related to saulos "twisting, wavering."

Related entries & more 
sausage (n.)

article of food consisting of chopped or minced meat, seasoned and stuffed into the cleaned gut of an ox, sheep, or pig, and tied at regular intervals, mid-15c., sawsyge, sausige, from Old North French saussiche (Old French saussice, Modern French saucisse), from Vulgar Latin *salsica "sausage," from salsicus "seasoned with salt," from Latin salsus "salted," from past participle of Old Latin sallere "to salt," from sal (genitive salis) "salt" (from PIE root *sal- "salt").

In 16c.-17c. often sawsage, sassage; Dickens has the latter as a colloquial pronunciation in 1837. Sausage factory in the literal sense is attested by 1831.

Related entries & more 

Page 48