Etymology
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savannah (n.)
also savanna, "treeless plain," 1550s, from Spanish sabana, earlier zavana "treeless plain," from Taino (Arawakan) zabana. In U.S. use, especially in Florida, "a tract of low-lying marshy ground" (1670s).
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Savannah 
port city in U.S. state of Georgia, from savana, name applied to the Native Americans in the area by early European explorers, perhaps from a self-designation of the Shawnee Indians, or from the European topographical term (see savannah).
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savant (n.)
"one eminent for learning," 1719, from French savant "a learned man," noun use of adjective savant "learned, knowing," former present participle of savoir "to know," from Vulgar Latin *sapere, from Latin sapere "be wise" (see sapient).
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savate (n.)
French method of fighting with the feet, 1862, from French savate, literally "a kind of shoe" (see sabotage).
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save (n.)
in the sports sense of "act of preventing opponent from scoring," 1890, from save (v.).
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save (prep.)
"except," early 14c., from adjective save, which also was an early variant of safe (adj.), paralleling evolution in Old French sauf "safe," prepositional use of the adjective, in phrases such as saulve l'honneur "save (our) honor;" also a use in Latin (salva lege, etc.).
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save (v.)

c. 1200, "to deliver from some danger; rescue from peril, bring to safety," also "prevent the death of;" also theological, "to deliver from sin or its consequences; admit to eternal life; gain salvation," from Old French sauver "keep (safe), protect, redeem," from Late Latin salvare "make safe, secure," from Latin salvus "safe" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept").

From c. 1300 as "reserve for future use, hold back, store up instead of spending;" hence "keep possession of" (late 14c.). As a quasi-preposition from c. 1300, "without prejudice or harm to," on model of French and Latin cognates.

To save face (1898) first was used among the British community in China and is said to be from Chinese; it has not been found in Chinese, but tiu lien "to lose face" does occur. To not (do something) to save one's life is recorded from 1848. To save (one's) breath "cease talking or arguing" is from 1926.

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saved (adj.)
"delivered from damnation," c. 1300, past-participle adjective from save (v.). Saved by the bell is from 1914 in reference to prize fighting; 1912 in reference to the classroom; figurative use from 1915, probably at first from the fighting sense.
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