Etymology
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canonical (adj.)
early 15c., "according to ecclesiastical law," from Medieval Latin canonicalis, from Late Latin canonicus "according to rule," in Church Latin, "pertaining to the canon" (see canon (n.1)). Earlier was canonial (early 13c.). General sense of "conformed or conforming to rule" is from 1560s. Meaning "of or belonging to the canon of Scripture" is from 1560s; hence "of admitted excellence" (1550s).
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misnomer (n.)

mid-15c., in law, "an error in a name, mistaken identification of an accused or convicted person," from Anglo-French, Old French mesnomer "to misname, wrongly name," noun use of infinitive, from mes- "wrongly" (see mis- (2)) + nomer "to name," from Latin nominare "nominate" (see nominate). For noun use of French infinitives, see waiver. Meaning "act of applying a wrong name or designation" is from 1630s.

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declarant (n.)

"one who makes a declaration," 1680s, from French déclarant, from Latin declarantem (nominative declarans), present participle of declarare  "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)). Especially in law, "one whose admission or statement is sought as evidence."

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agronomy (n.)

"science of land management for crop production," 1796, from French agronomie (1761), from Greek agronomos "overseer of land," from agros "a field, a farm; the country," as opposed to the town (from PIE root *agro- "field") + nomos "law or custom, administering" (see -nomy). Related: Agronomist; agronomic.

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citation (n.)

c. 1300, "summons, written notice to appear," from Old French citation or directly from Latin citationem (nominative citatio) "a command," noun of action from past participle stem of citare "to summon, urge, call; put in sudden motion, call forward; rouse, excite" (see cite).

Meaning "passage cited, quotation" is from 1540s; meaning "act of citing or quoting a passage from a book, etc." is from 1650s; in law, especially "a reference to decided cases or statutes." From 1918 as "a mention in an official dispatch."

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civilization (n.)

1704, in a now-obsolete sense "law which makes a criminal process civil," from civil + -ization. Sense of "civilized condition, state of being reclaimed from the rudeness of savage life" first recorded 1772, probably from French civilisation, serving as an opposite to barbarity and a distinct word from civility. From civilize + -ation. Sense of "a particular human society in a civilized condition, considered as a whole over time," is from 1857. Related: Civilizational.

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ritualistic (adj.)

1844, "pertaining to or according to ritual," with -ic + ritualist "one versed in or devoted to rituals" (1650s), later "one who advocates a particular sacramental ritual" (especially one established by law or custom), 1670s; see ritual (adj.). By late 19c. ritualistic meant especially "placing great emphasis on external forms and symbols." Related: Ritually; ritualism (1838).

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Eurydice 
wife of Orpheus in Greek mythology, from Latinized form of Greek Eurydike, literally "wide justice," from eurys "wide" (see eury-) + dike "custom, usage; justice, right; court case," "custom, usage," and, via the notion of "right as dependent on custom," "law, a right; a judgment; a lawsuit, court case, trial; penalty awarded by a judge," from PIE *dika-, from root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly."
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allegation (n.)

early 15c., "action of alleging, formal declaration in court," from Old French alegacion "allegation, affirmation" (Modern French allégation) and directly from Latin allegationem (nominative allegatio) "a sending, dispatching," noun of action from past-participle stem of allegare (see allege). Specifically in law, "assertion of a party to a suit or action, which he intends to prove." In general (non-legal) use, since 17c., often suggesting an assertion without proof.

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subversion (n.)
late 14c., "physical destruction, demolition, ruination; overthrow of a system or law," from Old French subversion "downfall, overthrow" (12c.), from Late Latin subversionem (nominative subversio) "an overthrow, ruin, destruction," noun of action from past participle stem of subvertere (see subvert).
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