Etymology
Advertisement
implosion (n.)

"a bursting inward, a sudden collapse," 1829, modeled on explosion, with assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in").

And to show how entire the neglect and confusion have been, they speak in the same breath of all these explosions, and of the explosion of a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen, the result of which, instead of being a gas or an enlargement of bulk, a positive quantity, is a negative one. It is a vacuum, in a popular sense, because the produce is water. The result is an implosion (to coin a word), not an explosion .... ["Gas-light," Westminster Review, October 1829]

In early use often in reference to effect of deep sea pressures, or in phonetics. Figurative sense is by 1960.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
insolation (n.)
"exposure to the sun's rays," 1610s, from French insolation (16c.), from Latin insolationem (nominative insolatio), noun of action from past participle stem of insolare "place in the sun, expose to the sun," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + sol "sun" (from PIE root *sawel- "the sun").
Related entries & more 
underpants (n.)

1931, from under + pants. Drove out drawers, knickers in this sense in American English.

Related entries & more 
fungi (n.)
Latin plural of fungus. In biology, in reference to one of the lowest of the great groups of cellular cryptograms.
Related entries & more 
jealously (adv.)
late 14c., "in a zealous manner;" 1718, "in a suspicious and possessive manner," from jealous + -ly (2).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
midterm (adj.)

also mid-term, "in the middle of a term" in any sense, from mid (adj.) + term (n.). By 1879 in reference to gestation; 1888 of college semesters (midterm examination is by 1900; student slang shortening midterms for these is by 1903). By 1891 in reference to U.S. congressional elections held in the middle of a four-year presidential term.

Related entries & more 
flasher (n.)
1680s, "something that emits light in flashes," agent noun from flash (v.). Meaning "male genital exhibitionist" is from 1960s (meat-flasher in this sense was attested in 1890s and flash (v.) in the sense "expose the genitals" is recorded by 1846). Johnson (1755) has it also in the sense "one who makes a show of more wit than he possesses."
Related entries & more 
Pietism (n.)

1690s, in reference to a specific religious movement, Pietism, from German Pietismus, originally applied in derision to the movement to revive personal piety in the Lutheran Church, begun in Frankfurt c. 1670 by Philipp Jakob Spener (1635-1705). See piety + -ism. With lower-case p- and in reference generally to devotion, godliness of life (as distinguished from mere intellectual orthodoxy), by 1829.

Related entries & more 
kahuna (n.)
1886, in a report in English by the Hawaiian government, which defines the word as "doctor and sorcerer," from Hawaiian, where it was applied as well to priests and navigators. In surfer slang, "a god of surfing," it is attested from 1962 (but big kahuna in same sense is said to date from 1950s).
Related entries & more 
yellow journalism 
"sensational chauvinism in the media," 1898, American English, from newspaper agitation for war with Spain; originally "publicity stunt use of colored ink" (1895) in reference to the popular Yellow Kid" character (his clothes were yellow) in Richard Outcault's comic strip "Shantytown" in the "New York World."
Related entries & more 

Page 45