Etymology
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pylon (n.)

1823, "gateway to an Egyptian temple," from Greek pylon "gateway," from pylē "gate, wing of a pair of double gates; an entrance, entrance into a country; mountain pass; narrow strait of water," a word of unknown etymology, perhaps a foreign technical term. The usual word for "door" in PIE in Greek took the form thyra (see thyroid). Meaning "tower for guiding aviators" (1909) led to that of "steel tower for high-tension wires" (1923).

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pylorus (n.)

"orifice of communication between the stomach and intestines," 1610s, from Late Latin pylorus "the lower orifice of the stomach," from Greek pylōros "lower orifice of the stomach," literally "gatekeeper, porter," from pylē "gate" (see pylon) + ouros "watcher, guardian" (from PIE root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for"). Related: Pyloric.

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pyo- 

word-forming element used from mid-19c. and meaning "pus," from Greek puon "pus" (see pus).

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pyogenic (adj.)

"having relation in the formation of pus," 1835, from pyogenesis, medical Latin; see pyo- "pus" + -genic "producing." Related: Pyogenetic (1855); pyogenesis.

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Pyongyang 
North Korean capital, from Korean p'yong "flat" + yang "land."
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pyracanth (n.)

thorny evergreen shrub of the apple family, found in the south of Europe, bearing white flowers and scarlet berries, 1660s, from Modern Latin genus name Pyracantha, from Greek pyrakantha (Dioscorides), a plant named but not described, from pyr "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire") + akantha, akanthos "thorn, thorny plant" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").

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pyramid (n.)

1550s "massive monumental stone structure of polygonl plan, the sides of which slope in planes to a common apex," also a geometrical solid resembling this, (earlier in Latin form piramis, late 14c., or nativized in Middle English as piram), from French pyramide (Old French piramide "obelisk, stela," 12c.), from Latin pyramides, plural of pyramis "one of the pyramids of Egypt," from Greek pyramis (plural pyramides) "a pyramid," which is apparently an alteration of Egyptian pimar "pyramid."

Greek pyramis also meant "kind of cake of roasted wheat-grains preserved in honey," and in this sense is said to derive from pyros "wheat" on the model of sesamis. According to some old sources the Egyptian pyramids were so called from their resemblance to the form of the cake, but Beekes points out that "the form of the cake is actually unknown."

Figurative of anything with a broad base and a small tip. Financial senses are by 1911. Related: Pyramidal (late 14c., piramidal).

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pyre (n.)

"pile or heap of wood or other combustible materials for burning a dead body," 1650s, from Latin pyra and directly from Greek pyra (Ionic pyrē) "funeral pyre; altar for sacrifice; watch-fire; hearth; any place where fire is kindled," from pyr "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire," source also of fire (n.)). Related: Pyral.

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Pyrenees 

chain of mountains between France and Spain, 1550s, from French Pyrénées, from Latin Pyrenæi montes, from Greek Pyrēnē, name of a daughter of Bebryx/Bebrycius who was beloved of Herakles; she is said to be buried in these mountains (or that the mountains are the tomb Herakles reared over her corpse).

The name is said to mean literally "fruit-stone," but Room says it might be Greek pyr "fire" + eneos "dumb, speechless," which perhaps translates or folk-etymologizes a Celtic goddess name. "In medieval times there was no overall name for the range and local people would have known only the names of individual mountains and valleys" [Adrian Room, "Place Names of the World," 2nd ed., 2006]. Related: Pyrenean.

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pyretic (adj.)

"characterized by or affected with fever," 1809, from French pyrétique or directly from Modern Latin pyreticus, from Greek pyretos "fever, burning heat," related to pyr "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire"). As a noun, "a pyretic agent," from 1728.

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