Etymology
Advertisement
deckle (n.)

1810, in paper-making, "rectangular frame on which the pulp is placed," from German deckel "lid, little cover," diminutive of decke "cover," from Old High German decchen "to cover," from Proto-Germanic *thakjan, from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover." Meaning "rough or raw edge of paper" is by 1858.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
go-cart (n.)

also gocart, 1670s, originally "a litter, sedan chair;" also "an infant's walker" (1680s), from go + cart (n.). Later also of hand carts (1759). The modern form go-kart (1959) was coined in reference to a kind of miniature racing car with a frame body and a two-stroke engine.

Related entries & more 
shutter (n.)

1540s, "one who shuts" (see shut (v.)); the meaning "movable wooden or iron frame or screen used as a cover for a window" is from 1720s (probably short for window-shutters, attested from 1680s). The photographic sense of "device for opening and closing the aperture of a lens" is from 1862.

Related entries & more 
barrow (n.1)

"flat, rectangular frame with projecting handles for carrying a load," c. 1300, barewe, probably from an unrecorded Old English *bearwe "basket, barrow," from beran "to bear, to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). The original (hand-barrow) had no wheel and required two persons to carry it.

Related entries & more 
hurdle (n.)

Old English hyrdel "frame of intertwined twigs used as a temporary barrier," diminutive of hyrd "door," from Proto-Germanic *hurdiz "wickerwork frame, hurdle" (source also of Old Saxon hurth "plaiting, netting," Dutch horde "wickerwork," German Hürde "hurdle, fold, pen;" Old Norse hurð, Gothic haurds "door"), from PIE *krtis (source also of Latin cratis "hurdle, wickerwork," Greek kartalos "a kind of basket," kyrtos "fishing creel"), from root *kert- "to weave, twist together" (source also of Sanskrit krt "to spin").

Used as temporary fencing in agriculture. Sense of "barrier to jump in a race" is by 1822 (hurdle-race also is from 1822); hurdles as a type of race (originally horse race) with hurdles as obstacles is attested by 1836. Figurative sense of "obstacle" is 1924.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pannier (n.)

c. 1300, paniere, "large basket for provisions," from Old French panier, paniere "basket," from Latin panarium "bread-basket," noun use of a neuter adjective meaning "pertaining to bread," from panis "bread" (from PIE root *pa- "to feed"). Transferred sense of "frame of whalebone, etc., used to distend the skirt of a woman's dress at the hips" is by 1869.

Related entries & more 
respirator (n.)

1836, "an aid to breathing," originally a sort of metallic gauze mask fitted to the face by a wire frame and meant to keep out smoke, dust, and especially cold air; agent noun from respire. The word was later used of gas masks in World War I. As "machine to provide artificial respiration" from 1929.

Related entries & more 
clothes-horse (n.)

also clothes horse, "upright wooden frame for hanging clothes to dry," 1788, from clothes + horse (n.) in its secondary sense "that upon which something is mounted." Figurative sense of "person whose sole function seems to be to show off clothes" is 1850. Clothes-screen, which had the same literal sense, is attested in the figurative sense from 1830.

Related entries & more 
dismount (v.)

1540s, "to remove or throw down cannons from their mountings," from dis- + mount (v.). Meaning "get off from a horse or other ridden animal" is from 1580s; transitive sense of "throw or bring down from a horse" is from 1610s. Meaning "remove (a gem, picture, etc.) from a frame, setting, or other mount" is by 1879. Related: Dismounted; dismounting.

Related entries & more 
shanty (n.1)

"rough cabin, hut, mean dwelling," 1820, said to be from Canadian French chantier "lumberjack's headquarters," in French, "timber-yard, dock," from Old French chantier "gantry," from Latin cantherius "rafter, frame" (see gantry). Shanty Irish in reference to the Irish underclass in the U.S., is from 1928 (title of a book by Jim Tully).

Related entries & more 

Page 4