Etymology
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sark (n.)

"shirt, chemise, body garment of linen or cotton for either sex," Middle English serk, late Old English serc "shirt, corselet, coat of mail," surviving as a Scottish and northern dialect word. It is either the Old English word influenced in pronunciation and spelling by its Old Norse cognate serkr, or that word in place of the native one. A general Germanic word (see shirt and also compare berserk.

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kinkajou (n.)
Central American mammal, 1796, from French (1670s), from an Algonquian word for the wolverine; the North American word was erroneously transferred by Buffon to the tropical animal.
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multisyllable (n.)

"a word of many syllables," by 1818 as a dictionary word, from multi- "many" + syllable. As an adjective, "consisting of or containing many syllables," by 1892.

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verbiage (n.)

"abundance of words," 1721, from French verbiage "wordiness" (17c.), from verbier "to chatter," from Old French verbe "word," from Latin verbum "word" (see verb).

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verb (n.)

"a word that asserts or declares; that part of speech of which the office is predication, and which, either alone or with various modifiers or adjuncts, combines with a subject to make a sentence" [Century Dictionary], late 14c., from Old French verbe "word; word of God; saying; part of speech that expresses action or being" (12c.) and directly from Latin verbum "verb," originally "a word," from PIE root *were- (3) "to speak" (source also of Avestan urvata- "command;" Sanskrit vrata- "command, vow;" Greek rhētōr "public speaker," rhetra "agreement, covenant," eirein "to speak, say;" Hittite weriga- "call, summon;" Lithuanian vardas "name;" Gothic waurd, Old English word "word").

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savory (n.)

aromatic evergreen herb, late 14c. (mid-13c. in surnames), savereie, savory, which is ultimately from Latin satureia "savory (n.)," a foreign word of unknown origin. The Middle English word is perhaps an alteration of Old English sæþerie, which apparently is from an Old French development of the Latin word (compare Old French sarree, and, later, savereie). In either case, the form of the word likely was altered along the way by influence of the Middle English or Old French form of savory (adj.). "As with other plant-names of unobvious meaning, the word has suffered much variation in popular speech" [Century Dictionary].

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kookaburra (n.)
1883, from a native Australian word.
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freightage (n.)
1690s, "money paid for transporting," a hybrid word, from freight (n.) + -age. From 1803 as "freight, cargo." The older word was fraughtage (late 14c.).
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jotun (n.)
"one of the race of giants in Scandinavian mythology," 1804, a word revived by scholars from Old Norse jotunn "a giant," from the common Germanic word (see ettin).
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pilchard (n.)

fish of the herring family, 1540s, earlier pilcher (1520s), a word of unknown origin, with unetymological -d, perhaps by influence of words in -ard. Century Dictionary suggests Celtic origin, as the fish appear every July in great numbers on the Cornish coast; OED says the Irish word for them is from the English word.

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