Etymology
Advertisement
logogriph (n.)
type of word puzzle based on synonyms, etc., and often in the form of a verse, 1590s, from French logogriphe, from Greek logos "word" (see Logos) + gripos/griphos "riddle," a figurative use, literally "fishing basket, creel," probably from a pre-Greek word in a lost Mediterranean language. "The variation [p/ph] is typical for Pre-Greek words; such an origin for a fisherman's word is quite understandable" [Beekes].
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
gematria (n.)
1680s, from Hebrew gematriya, a transliteration of Greek geometria (see geometry). "[E]xplanation of the sense of a word by substituting for it another word, so that the numerical value of the letters constituting either word is identical" [Klein].
Related entries & more 
myelo- 

before vowels myel-, word-forming element meaning "marrow, spinal cord," from Greek myelos "marrow; the brain," a word of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
polysyllable (n.)

"a word of several syllables," 1560s; see poly- "many" + syllable. As a rule, a word of more than three syllables.

Related entries & more 
morpho- 

before vowels morph-, word-forming element of Greek origin meaning "form, shape," from Greek morphē "form, shape; beauty, outward appearance," a word of uncertain etymology.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sark (n.)

"shirt, chemise, body garment of linen or cotton for either sex," Middle English serk, late Old English serc "shirt, corselet, coat of mail," surviving as a Scottish and northern dialect word. It is either the Old English word influenced in pronunciation and spelling by its Old Norse cognate serkr, or that word in place of the native one. A general Germanic word (see shirt and also compare berserk.

Related entries & more 
phlebo- 

word-forming element in medicine meaning "a vein or veins," from Greek phlebo-, combining form of phleps "vein," a word of uncertain origin.

Related entries & more 
back-formation (n.)

also back formation, "word formed from an existing word, often by removal of a suffix or supposed suffix," by 1887, from back (adv.) + formation.

Related entries & more 
kinkajou (n.)
Central American mammal, 1796, from French (1670s), from an Algonquian word for the wolverine; the North American word was erroneously transferred by Buffon to the tropical animal.
Related entries & more 
multisyllable (n.)

"a word of many syllables," by 1818 as a dictionary word, from multi- "many" + syllable. As an adjective, "consisting of or containing many syllables," by 1892.

Related entries & more 

Page 4