Etymology
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cleavage (n.)

1805, in geology and mineralogy, "tendency (of rocks or gems) to break cleanly along natural fissures," from cleave (v.1) + -age. General meaning "action or state of cleaving or being cleft" is from 1867.

The sense of "cleft between a woman's breasts in low-cut clothing" is first recorded 1946, defined in a "Time" magazine article [Aug. 5] as the "Johnston Office trade term for the shadowed depression dividing an actress' bosom into two distinct sections;" traditionally first used in this sense by U.S. publicist Joseph I. Breen (1888-1965), head of the Production Code Administration (replaced 1945 by Eric Johnston), enforcers of Hollywood self-censorship, in reference to Jane Russell's costumes and poses in "The Outlaw."

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tuck (n.)

late 14c., "flattened fold in clothing, pleat," from tuck (v.). As a folded-up diving position, from 1951.

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tell (n.)

"mound, hill," 1864, from Arabic tall, related to Hebrew tel "mount, hill, heap." Compare Hebrew talul "lofty," Akkadian tillu "woman's breast."

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phoebe (n.)

small North American flycatcher, the peewit, 1700, phebe, so called in imitation of its cry; the spelling was altered (1839) by influence of the woman's proper name Phoebe.

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frog (n.2)

type of fastening for clothing, 1719, originally a belt loop for carrying a weapon, of unknown origin; perhaps from Portuguese froco, from Latin floccus "tuft of wool," a word of unknown etymology.

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fastener (n.)

1755, "one who fastens," agent noun from fasten (v.). From 1792 of mechanical devices (for clothing, etc.).

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skin-tight (adj.)

"fitting like skin, as tight as skin," 1885, originally of men's clothing, from skin (n.) + tight (adj.).

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pajamas (n.)

also pajamahs, 1800, pai jamahs "loose trousers tied at the waist," worn by Muslims in India and adopted by Europeans there, especially for nightwear, from Hindi pajama, probably from Persian paejamah, literally "leg clothing," from pae "leg" (from PIE root *ped- "foot") + jamah "clothing, garment." The modern U.S. spelling is by 1845; British spelling tends toward pyjamas.

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duster (n.)

1570s, "dust brush for clothes," agent noun from dust (v.). Meaning "sifter, fine sieve" is from 1660s; that of "light overcoat or wrap worn to keep off dust from clothing" is from 1864.

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