Etymology
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phyto- 
word-forming element meaning "plant," from Greek phyton "plant," literally "that which has grown," from phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."
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narcissus (n.)

type of bulbous flowering plant, 1540s, from Latin narcissus, from Greek narkissos, a plant name, not the modern narcissus, possibly a type of iris or lily, associated with Greek narkē "numbness" (see narcotic (n.)) because of the sedative effect of the alkaloids in the plant, but Beekes considers this folk-etymology and writes that "The suffix clearly points to a Pre-Greek word."

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alkanet (n.)

mid-14c., "the plant alkanet" or its root (which yields a red dye material and is used as a styptic), from Medieval Latin, from a diminutive of alcanna, from Arabic al-hinna (see henna). As the name of the plant itself, from 1560s.

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arnica (n.)

plant genus of the borage family, native to central Europe, 1753, Modern Latin, a name of unknown origin. Klein suggests Arabic arnabiyah, a name of a type of plant, as the ultimate source. Century Dictionary suggests "perhaps a perversion of ptarmica."

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Plantagenet 
house or family which reigned in England from 1154 to 1485, the name apparently is literally "broom-plant" (French plante genêt), from Latin genista "broom plant."
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hoya (n.)
"honey-plant," climbing, flowering plant of southeast Asia, 1816, named in Modern Latin in honor of English gardener and botanist Thomas Hoy (c. 1750-1822).
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xerophyte (n.)
1897, from xero- + Greek phyton "a plant" (see phyto-).
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vanillin (n.)
substance prepared from fruit of the vanilla plant, 1859, from vanilla + -in (2).
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silphium (n.)
plant genus, 1771, from Latin, from Greek Silphion, name of a North African Mediterranean plant whose identity has been lost, the gum or juice of which was prized by the ancients as a condiment and a medicine. Probably of African origin.
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quickset (adj.)

"formed of living plants," 1530s, from earlier noun, "a living plant set to grow for a hedge" (late 15c.), from quick (n.) "a live fence or hedge formed of some growing plant," especially hawthorn (mid-15c.); see quick (adj.) + set (v.).

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