Etymology
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congratulate (v.)

"address with expressions of sympathetic pleasure," 1540s, from Latin congratulatus, past participle of congratulari "wish joy," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor"). Related: Congratulated; congratulating; congratulable.

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intention (n.)

late 14c., entencioun, "purpose, design, aim or object; will, wish, desire, that which is intended," from Old French entencion "intent, purpose, aspiration; will; thought" (12c.), from Latin intentionem (nominative intentio) "a stretching out, straining, exertion, effort; attention," noun of action from intendere "to turn one's attention," literally "to stretch out" (see intend). Also in Middle English "emotion, feelings; heart, mind, mental faculties, understanding."

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benevolent (adj.)

mid-15c., "wishing to do good, well-disposed, kindly," from Old French benivolent and directly from Latin benevolentem (nominative benevolens) "wishing (someone) well, benevolent," related to benevolentia "good feeling," from bene "well" (see bene-) + volentem (nominative volens) present participle of velle "to wish" (see will (v.)). Related: Benevolently.

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request (v.)

1530s, "ask (someone) to (do something), express desire for something to be done;" 1560s, "express a wish or desire, ask to be allowed to do something," from request (n.) or from French requester, "ask again, request, reclaim," from requeste. The older verb was Middle English requeren (14c.), from Old French requerre and directly from Latin requiare. Related: Requested; requesting.

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malevolence (n.)

"the character of being ill-disposed toward another or others; ill-will, malice, personal hatred," mid-15c., from Old French malevolence and directly from Latin malevolentia "ill-will, dislike, hatred," from malevolentem (nominative malevolens) "ill-disposed, wishing ill, spiteful, envious," from male "badly" (see mal-) + volentem (nominative volens), present participle of velle "to wish" (see will (v.)) 

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requiescat (n.)

a wish or prayer for the repose of the dead, from the Latin phrase requiescat in pace (often abbreviated R.I.P.), literally "may he (or she) begin to rest in peace," with third person singular inceptive (or subjunctive) of requiescere "rest (after labor), be idle, repose," especially of the dead (see requiem). The phrase is "frequent in sepulchral inscriptions" [Century Dictionary].

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lust (v.)

c. 1200, "to wish, to desire eagerly," from lust (n.), absorbing or replacing the older verb, Old English lystan (see list (v.4)). In Middle English also "to please, delight." Sense of "to have an intense, especially sexual, desire (for or after)" is first attested 1520s in biblical use. Related: Lusted; lusting.

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sibyl (n.)

"woman supposed to possess powers of prophecy, female soothsayer," c. 1200, from Old French sibile, sibille, from Latin Sibylla, from Greek Sibylla, a name for any of several prophetesses consulted by ancient Greeks and Romans. The word is of uncertain origin, by Jerome said to be from Doric Siobolla, from Attic Theoboulē "divine wish." Also in Old English as Sibylla.

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opt (v.)

"wish for, choose, desire," 1877, from French opter "to choose" (16c.), from Latin optare "choose, desire" (see option). For the first few years only in English in a French context. An earlier word for the same thing was optate (1610s), from Latin optatus. To opt out "choose not to participate" is by 1922. Related: Opted; opting.

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list (v.1)

"to tilt, lean, incline to one side," especially of a ship, 1880, earlier spelled lust (1620s), of unknown origin. Perhaps an unexplained spelling variant of Middle English lysten "to please, desire, wish, like" (see list (v.4)) with a sense development from the notion of "leaning" toward what one desires (compare incline (v.)). Related: Listed; listing.

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