Etymology
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testate (adj.)
"having left a valid will," late 15c., from Latin testatus "public, manifest, published," past participle of testari "make a will, be witness to, declare" (see testament).
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malicious (adj.)

mid-13c., "harboring ill-will, enmity, or hostility," from Old French malicios "showing ill will, spiteful, wicked" (Modern French malicieux), from Latin malitiosus "wicked, malicious," from malitia "badness, ill will, spite," from malus "bad, unpleasant" (see mal-). In legal use (early 14c., Anglo-French), it means "characterized by malice prepense" (see malice).

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testament (n.)
late 13c., "last will disposing of property," from Latin testamentum "a last will, publication of a will," from testari "make a will, be witness to," from testis "witness," from PIE *tri-st-i- "third person standing by," from root *tris- "three" (see three) on the notion of "third person, disinterested witness."

Use in reference to the two divisions of the Bible (early 14c.) is from Late Latin vetus testamentum and novum testamentum, loan-translations of Greek palaia diatheke and kaine diatheke. Late Latin testamentum in this case was a confusion of the two meanings of Greek diatheke, which meant both "covenant, dispensation" and "will, testament," and was used in the former sense in the account of the Last Supper (see testimony) but subsequently was interpreted as Christ's "last will."
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pocketful (n.)

"as much as will fill a pocket," 1610s, from pocket (n.) + -ful.

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cannon-shot (n.)
"distance a cannon will throw a ball," 1570s, from cannon (n.) + shot (n.).
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doofer (n.)

1937, indicative of something that will do for the present need or purpose.

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grudge (n.)
"ill will excited by some special cause," late 15c., from grudge (v.).
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intestacy (n.)
"condition of dying without leaving a valid will," 1740, from intestate + -acy.
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fistful (n.)
"as much as a fist will hold," 1610s, from fist (n.) + -ful.
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bagful (n.)
"as much as a bag will hold," c. 1300, bagge-ful, from bag (n.) + -ful.
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