Etymology
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Umayyad 

also Omayyad, member of a Muslim dynasty which ruled the Caliphate 661-750 C.E. and in 756 C.E. founded an emirate in Spain, 1758, from Arabic, from Umayya, proper name of an ancestor of Muhammad from whom the dynasty claimed descent.

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hopeful (adj.)
c. 1200, "full of hope," from hope (n.) + -ful. From 1560s as "having qualities which excited hope." As a noun, "one on whom hopes are set," from 1720. Often ironic in colloquial use, of willful or incorrigible offspring. Related: Hopefulness.
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inamorata (n.)
"female lover, woman with whom one is in love," 1650s, from Italian innamorata "mistress, sweetheart," noun use of fem. of innamorato, past participle of innamorare "to fall in love," from in "in" (from Latin, see in) + amore "love," from Latin amor (see Amy).
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appellee (n.)
"person against whom an appeal is brought," 1530s, from Anglo-French (late 14c.), from Old French apelé (Modern French appelé) "accused, defendant," noun use of past participle of appeler "speak to, call upon, appeal to, address, call by name;" see appeal (v.) + -ee.
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paraprofessional (adj.)

of persons, "performing part of a professional task but not having professional training or credentials," by 1961 in education, from para- (1) + professional (adj.). As a noun, "person without professional credentials or training to whom a part of a professional task is delegated," by 1968.

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Arawakan (n.)
language group formerly widespread in the West Indies and South America, 1910, from the self-designation of the Arawak people on continental South America. They were identical with, or closely related to the natives whom Columbus encountered on the islands, who were historically called Taino.
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Camden (n.)
city in New Jersey, U.S., 1783, named for Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden (1714-1794), Whig politician who was popular in America due to his opposition to British taxation policies and for whom many American towns and counties were named.
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memorious (adj.)

1590s, "having a good memory," from French memorieux or directly from Medieval Latin memoriosus, from Latin memoria (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). By 1856 (Sir Richard F. Burton, with whom it seems to have been a pet word) as "worthy to be remembered."

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door-mat (n.)

also doormat, "heavy mat placed before a door for use in cleaning the shoes by those entering," 1660s, from door + mat. Figurative use in reference to persons people "walk all over" or upon whom they (figuratively) clean their boots is by 1861.

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quorum (n.)

early 15c., in law, "the senior justices of the peace," whose presence was necessary to constitute a court, from Latin quorum "of whom," genitive plural (masc. and neuter; fem. quarum) of qui "who" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns).

The traditional wording of the commission appointing justices of the peace translates as, "We have also assigned you, and every two or more of you (of whom [quoram vos] any one of you the aforesaid A, B, C, D, etc. we will shall be one) our justices to inquire the truth more fully." The justices so-named usually were called the justices of the quorum.

Meaning "fixed number of members of any constituted body whose presence at a particular meeting is necessary to transact business" is recorded by 1610s.

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