Etymology
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guess-work (n.)
also guesswork, "what is done by or due to guess," 1725, from guess (v.) + work (n.).
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off-target (adj.)

"missing what was aimed at," 1947 (in reference to missiles), from off (prep.) + target (n.).

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je ne sais quoi (n.)

"an inexpressible something," French, literally "I do not know what."

[T]hey are troubled with the je-ne-scay-quoy, that faign themselves sick out of niceness but know not where their own grief lies, or what ayls them. [Thomas Blount, "Glossographia," 1656]
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historic (adj.)
1660s, "of or belonging to history," probably a back-formation from historical, perhaps influenced by French historique. Meaning "what is noted or celebrated in history" is from 1794.

Though both historic and historical have been used in both senses by respected authors, now the tendency is to reserve historic for what is noted or celebrated in history; historical for what deals with history. The earliest adjective form of the word in English was historial (late 14c., from Late Latin historialis), which meant "belonging to history; dealing with history; literal, factual, authentic," and also "of historical importance" (early 15c.).
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staid (adj.)

1540s, "fixed, permanent," adjectival use of stayed, past participle of stay (v.). Meaning "sober, sedate" first recorded 1550s. As in Philip Sidney's justice staid, explained by Ruskin as "The desire of what is just, being stayed or restrained within the limits of what can be accomplished by just means." Related: Staidly.

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manxome 

1871, a word invented by Lewis Carroll ("Jabberwocky"). Anyone's guess what he meant by it.

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Ephesians (n.)
New Testament epistle, late 14c., addressed to Christian residents of the Ionian Greek city of Ephesus, in what now is western Turkey.
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right-minded (adj.)

"having a mind naturally disposed toward what is right," 1580s, from right (adj.1) + -minded.

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bygones (n.)
"things that are past, what has gone by," especially offenses, 1560s, from plural of noun use of bygone (q.v.).
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quibble (n.)

1610s, "a pun, a play on words," probably a diminutive of obsolete quib "evasion of a point at issue" (1540s), which is based on Latin quibus? "by what (things)?" Its extensive use in legal writing supposedly gave it the association with trivial argument: "a word of frequent occurrence in legal documents ... hence associated with the 'quirks and quillets' of the law." [OED].

Latin quibus is dative or ablative plural of quid "in what respect? to what extent?; how? why?," neuter of relative pronoun quis (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns).

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