Etymology
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nurse (n.1)

c. 1200, norice, nurrice, "wet-nurse, woman who nourishes or suckles an infant; foster-mother to a young child," from Old French norrice "foster-mother, wet-nurse, nanny" (source of proper name Norris), from Late Latin *nutricia "nurse, governess, tutoress," noun use of fem. of Latin nutricius "that suckles, nourishes," from nutrix (genitive nutricis) "wet-nurse," from nutrire "to suckle" (see nourish).

The modern form of the English word is from late 14c. By 16c. also "female servant who has care of a child or children" (technically a dry-nurse). As "one who protects or that which nurtures, trains, or cherishes," from early 15c. Meaning "person (usually a woman) who takes care of sick or infirm persons" in English is recorded by 1580s.

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mat (adj.)
1640s, "lusterless, dull" (of a color or surface), from French mat "dull, dead surface," from Old French mat "beaten down, withered, afflicted, dejected; dull," which is perhaps from Latin mattus "maudlin with drink," from madere "to be wet or sodden, be drunk," from PIE root *mad- "to be wet, drip" (see mast (n.2)). Or the French word might represent a transferred use from chess of mater "to checkmate, defeat," from Arabic (see mate (v.2)).
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hygroscope (n.)
"device which indicates atmospheric humidity," 1660s, from hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" + -scope. It indicates the presence of moisture but not the amount (which is measured by a hygrometer). Related: Hygroscopic.
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shod (adj.)

"wearing shoes," late 14c. (in dry-shod and wet-shod), from Middle English past participle of shoe (v.), surviving chiefly in compounds, such as roughshod, slipshod, etc.

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inundation (n.)

"an overflowing, a flood," early 15c., from Latin inundationem (nominative inundatio) "an overflowing," noun of action from past-participle stem of inundare "to overflow," from in- "onto" (from PIE root *en "in") + undare "to flow," from unda "a wave," from PIE *unda-, nasalized form of root *wed- (1) "water; wet."

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splosh (v.)
1889 [in Farmer, who calls it "A New England variant of splash"], ultimately imitative. Perhaps influenced by splish-splosh "sound made by feet walking through wet" (1881). Related: Sploshed; sploshing.
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bedraggle (v.)

"to soil or wet by dragging in dirt or mud or from being rained upon," 1727, from be- + draggle "to drag or draw along damp ground or mud." Also in a similar sense were bedrabble (mid-15c.), bedaggle (1570s).

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pin-oak (n.)

type of tree found in wet places in the Eastern U.S., from pin (n.) + oak; "so named in allusion to the persistent dead branches, which resemble pins driven into the trunk" [Century Dictionary].

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anhydrous (adj.)
"containing no water," 1809, a modern coinage from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + hydor "water" (from PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet") + -ous. Greek did have anhydros "waterless," used of arid lands or corpses that had not been given proper funeral rites.
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hydrate (v.)
1812 (implied in hydrated), "to form a hydrate, combine chemically with water," from hydrate (n.), perhaps modeled on French hydrater. From 1947 as "to restore moisture;" from Greek hydr-, stem of hydor "water" (from suffixed form of PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet") + -ate (2). Related: Hydrating.
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