Etymology
Advertisement
hydrant (n.)
"apparatus for drawing water from a street main," 1806, from Greek hydr-, stem of hydor "water" (from suffixed form of PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet") + -ant. OED double-damns it as "Irregularly formed" and "of U.S. origin."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
oozy (adj.)

Old English wosig "juicy, moist;" see ooze (v.) + -y (2). Original sense now obsolete; meaning "containing or resembling fine soft mud; having the consistency of wet mud or slime" is from 1560s. Related: Ooziness.

Related entries & more 
moisturize (v.)

"impart moisture to, remove dryness, make slightly damp or wet," 1915 (implied in moisturizing), in reference to a commercial egg incubator, from moisture + -ize. By 1953 in reference to creams and lotions for the skin. Related: Moisturized; moisturization.

Related entries & more 
plash (n.)

"small puddle, shallow pool, wet ground," Old English plæsc "pool of water, puddle," probably imitative (compare plash (v.1) and Dutch plass "pool"). Meaning "noise made by splashing" is recorded by 1510s. Related: Plashy.

Related entries & more 
nurse (n.1)

c. 1200, norice, nurrice, "wet-nurse, woman who nourishes or suckles an infant; foster-mother to a young child," from Old French norrice "foster-mother, wet-nurse, nanny" (source of proper name Norris), from Late Latin *nutricia "nurse, governess, tutoress," noun use of fem. of Latin nutricius "that suckles, nourishes," from nutrix (genitive nutricis) "wet-nurse," from nutrire "to suckle" (see nourish).

The modern form of the English word is from late 14c. By 16c. also "female servant who has care of a child or children" (technically a dry-nurse). As "one who protects or that which nurtures, trains, or cherishes," from early 15c. Meaning "person (usually a woman) who takes care of sick or infirm persons" in English is recorded by 1580s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mat (adj.)
1640s, "lusterless, dull" (of a color or surface), from French mat "dull, dead surface," from Old French mat "beaten down, withered, afflicted, dejected; dull," which is perhaps from Latin mattus "maudlin with drink," from madere "to be wet or sodden, be drunk," from PIE root *mad- "to be wet, drip" (see mast (n.2)). Or the French word might represent a transferred use from chess of mater "to checkmate, defeat," from Arabic (see mate (v.2)).
Related entries & more 
hydro- 
before vowels hydr-, word-forming element in compounds of Greek origin, meaning "water," from Greek hydro-, combining form of hydor "water" (from suffixed form of PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet"). Also sometimes a combining form of hydrogen.
Related entries & more 
hygroscope (n.)
"device which indicates atmospheric humidity," 1660s, from hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" + -scope. It indicates the presence of moisture but not the amount (which is measured by a hygrometer). Related: Hygroscopic.
Related entries & more 
inundation (n.)

"an overflowing, a flood," early 15c., from Latin inundationem (nominative inundatio) "an overflowing," noun of action from past-participle stem of inundare "to overflow," from in- "onto" (from PIE root *en "in") + undare "to flow," from unda "a wave," from PIE *unda-, nasalized form of root *wed- (1) "water; wet."

Related entries & more 
*sna- 
*snā-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to swim," with extended form *(s)nāu- "to swim, flow; to let flow," hence "to suckle."

It forms all or part of: naiad; natant; natation; natatorial; natatorium; nekton; nourish; nurse; nursery; nurture; nutrient; nutriment; nutrition; nutritious; nutritive; supernatant.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit snati "bathes," snauti "she drips, gives milk;" Avestan snayeite "washes, cleans;" Armenian nay "wet, liquid;" Greek notios "wet, damp," Greek nan "I flow," nekhein "to swim;" Latin nare "to swim," natator "swimmer;" Middle Irish snaim "I swim," snam "a swimming."
Related entries & more 

Page 4