Etymology
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Mummerset (n.)

"imaginary west-of-England country dialect used on stage," by 1925, from mummer + Somerset.

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poisonwood (n.)

"small poisonous tree of the West Indies and southern Florida," 1721, from poison (n.) + wood (n.).

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juju (n.1)
object of religious veneration among West Africans, 1860, supposedly ultimately from French joujou "toy, plaything."
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zephyr (n.)
mid-14c., from Old English Zefferus, from Latin Zephyrus (source also of French zéphire, Spanish zefiro, Italian zeffiro), from Greek Zephyros "the west wind" (sometimes personified as a god), probably related to zophos "the west, the dark region, darkness, gloom." Extended sense of "mild breeze" is c. 1600. Related: Zephyrean.
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dat 
representing the pronunciation of that in West Indian, Irish, or African-American vernacular speech, from 1680s.
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barracuda (n.)

large voracious fish of the West Indies and Florida, 1670s, barracoutha, from American Spanish barracuda, which is perhaps from a Carib word.

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Tia Maria (n.)
coffee-flavored, rum-based liqueur, originally made in the West Indies, 1948, Spanish, literally "Aunt Mary."
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besmear (v.)
Old English bismierwan, besmyrwan (West Saxon), besmerwan (Anglian); see be- + smear (v.). Related: Besmeared; besmearing.
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guava (n.)
1550s, from Spanish guaya, variant of guayaba, from Arawakan (West Indies) guayabo "guava tree" or Tupi guajava.
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chimpanzee (n.)

large type of West African ape, 1738, from a Bantu language of Angola (compare Tshiluba kivili-chimpenze "ape").

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