Etymology
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well-earned (adj.)
1730, from well (adv.) + past participle of earn (v.).
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well-endowed (adj.)
1680s, "with ample material endowments," from well (adv.) + past participle of endow (v.). Sexual sense is attested from 1951. A Middle English term for "naturally well-endowed" was furnished in nature.
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well-informed (adj.)
mid-15c., from well (adv.) + past participle of inform (v.).
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ink-well (n.)
also inkwell, 1854, from ink (n.) + well (n.). A schoolroom implement, so called because it sat down in the surface of a desk in contrast to an ink-stand.
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oil-well (n.)

"a boring in the earth made for petroleum," 1847, from oil (n.) + well (n.).

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well-rounded (adj.)

1764, "symmetrically proportioned, complete in all parts," from well (adv.) + rounded. Figurative sense is from mid-19c.

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ne'er-do-well (n.)
"one who is good for nothing," 1737, Scottish and northern English dialect, from contraction of phrase never do well. The adjective is first recorded 1773.
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anigh (adv.)
"nearby," c. 1200, from a- (1) + nigh.
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near (adv.)

Old English near "closer, nearer," comparative of neah, neh"nigh." Partially by the influence of Old Norse naer "near," it came to be used in English as a positive form mid-13c., and new comparative nearer developed in the 1500s (see nigh). Originally an adverb but now supplanted in most such senses by nearly; it has in turn supplanted correct nigh as an adjective.

The adjectival use dates from c. 1300, "being close by, not distant;" from late 14c. as "closely related by kinship;" 1610s as "economical, parsimonious." Colloquial use for "so as to barely escape injury or danger" (as in a near thing, near miss) is by 1751. As a preposition, "close to, close by, near in space or time," from mid-13c. Related: Nearness. In near and dear (1620s) it refers to nearness of kinship. Near East is by 1894 (probably based on Far East). Near beer "low-alcoholic brew" is from 1908.

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