Etymology
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well-earned (adj.)
1730, from well (adv.) + past participle of earn (v.).
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well-endowed (adj.)
1680s, "with ample material endowments," from well (adv.) + past participle of endow (v.). Sexual sense is attested from 1951. A Middle English term for "naturally well-endowed" was furnished in nature.
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well-nigh (adv.)
Old English wel neah, from well (adv.) + nigh.
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well-informed (adj.)
mid-15c., from well (adv.) + past participle of inform (v.).
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ink-well (n.)
also inkwell, 1854, from ink (n.) + well (n.). A schoolroom implement, so called because it sat down in the surface of a desk in contrast to an ink-stand.
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oil-well (n.)

"a boring in the earth made for petroleum," 1847, from oil (n.) + well (n.).

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well-rounded (adj.)

1764, "symmetrically proportioned, complete in all parts," from well (adv.) + rounded. Figurative sense is from mid-19c.

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ne'er-do-well (n.)
"one who is good for nothing," 1737, Scottish and northern English dialect, from contraction of phrase never do well. The adjective is first recorded 1773.
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Holocene (adj.)

in reference to the epoch that began 10,000 years ago and continues today, 1897, from French holocène (1867), from Greek holos "whole" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept") + -cene. The notion is "entirely new."

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