Etymology
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beeswax (n.)
also bees-wax, "wax secreted by bees and used in making the cells of their hives," 1670s, from genitive of bee + wax (n.). As a jocular alteration of business (usually in an injunction to someone to mind his own) attested from 1934 in Lower East Side slang as reproduced in Henry Roth's "Call It Sleep."
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candelabrum (n.)
"kind of stand used to support lamps or candles," 1811, from Latin candelabrum, which meant "candlestick," from candela "a light, torch, candle made of tallow or wax" (see candle). Old English had candeltreow "candle-tree" in same sense. The word was borrowed earlier (late 14c.) from Old French as chaundelabre with the Latin sense. Candelabra is the Latin plural.
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Cereus (n.)

cactus genus, 1730, from Latin cereus "waxen, waxy," from cera "wax" (see cero-). So called from its shape, which suggests a wax candle.

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ceromancy (n.)

"divination by means of melted wax dripped in water" (the shapes supposedly previsioning a future spouse, etc.), 1650s, from French ceromancie, Medieval Latin ceromantia; see cero-  "wax" + -mancy "divination by means of."

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waxen (adj.)
Old English wexen; see wax (n.) + -en (2).
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hubristic (adj.)
also hybristic, 1831, from Greek hybristikos "given to wantonness, insolent," from hybrizein "to wax wanton, run riot," related to hybris (see hubris).
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seal (v.)

c. 1200, selen, "to fasten (a letter, etc.) with or as with a seal, close up with a seal, press a seal on wax," also "place a seal on (a document)," also figurative, "to join together," from seal (n.1) or else from Old French seeler, sealer.

Hence "to conclude, ratify, render official or binding" by affixing seals to it (late 15c.). In reference to jars or other containers, "to close up with wax, lead, cement, etc.," attested from 1660s, from the notion of wax seals on envelopes. In reference to the actions of wood-coatings, "render impervious," by 1940. Related: Sealed; sealing.

Sealing-wax, "soft substance prepared for receiving the impression of a seal," is attested from c. 1300. To seal (one's) lips "be silent" is by 1782. To seal (one's) fate (1799) "decide irrevocably" perhaps reflects the notion of a seal on a warrant of execution.

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ear-plug (n.)

also earplug, "piece of wax, rubber, cotton, etc., inserted in the ear as protection against noise or water," 1841, from ear (n.1) + plug (n.).

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cire (adj.)

"having a smooth, polished surface," 1921, from French ciré, literally "waxed" (12c.), from Latin cera "wax" (see cere (n.)). Often short for ciré silk.

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lamplight (n.)
also lamp-light, "the light shown by lamps," late 14c., from lamp + light (n.). Related: Lamplighter (1750).
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