Etymology
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post-bellum (adj.)

also postbellum, used in U.S. South from 1874 in reference to American Civil War; Latin; from post "after" (see post-) + bellum "war" (see bellicose).

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guerrilla (n.)
"fighter in an irregular, independent armed force," 1809, from Spanish guerrilla "body of skirmishers, skirmishing warfare," literally "little war," diminutive of guerra "war," from a Germanic source cognate with Old High German werra "strife, conflict, war," from Proto-Germanic *werra- (see war (n.)). Acquired by English during the Peninsular War (1808-1814), when bands of Spanish peasants and shepherds annoyed the occupying French. Purists failed in their attempt to keep this word restricted to "irregular warfare" and prevent it taking on the sense properly belonging to guerrillero "guerrilla fighter." Figurative use by 1861. As an adjective from 1811.
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Bellona 
Roman goddess of war, from Latin bellum "war" (Old Latin duellum, dvellum), which is of uncertain origin (see bellicose). Her temple stood outside the walls.
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bellicose (adj.)

early 15c., "inclined to fighting," from Latin bellicosus "warlike, valorous, given to fighting," from bellicus "of war," from bellum "war" (Old Latin duellum, dvellum), which is of uncertain origin.

The best etymology for duellum so far has been proposed by Pinault 1987, who posits a dim. *duelno- to bonus. If *duelno- meant 'quite good, quite brave', its use in the context of war (bella acta, bella gesta) could be understood as a euphemism, ultimately yielding a meaning 'action of valour, war' for the noun bellum. [de Vaan]
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warlike (adj.)
early 15c., from war (n.) + like (adj.).
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co-belligerent (n.)

"one who is mutually at war" (as distinguished from an ally), 1813, a word from the Napoleonic wars, from co- + belligerent. As an adjective, "carrying on war in conjunction with another power," from 1828.

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anti-imperialist (adj.)
1898, American English, in debates about the Spanish-American War, from anti- + imperialist. It was the title of a weekly anti-war publication begun in 1899. Related: Anti-imperialism.
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recce 

1941, World War II military slang, short for reconnaissance (n.). As a verb by 1943. The World War I military slang term for the noun was recco (1917). Also compare recon.

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polemarch (n.)

"commander of the army," a title of certain officers in Greek history, 1570s, from Greek polemarkhos "one who begins or leads a war," from polemos "war" (a word of unknown origin) + arkhos "leader, chief, ruler" (see archon).

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