Etymology
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calculating (n.)

1710, "calculation," verbal noun from calculate (v.). Calculating-machine "mechanical computer, machine which performs mathematical calculations" is from 1830 [Babbage].

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calender (n.)

"machine consisting of close-set revolving cylinders or rolls which smooths and presses paper, cloth, etc.," 1510s (late 13c. in calenderer, surname of persons who use such a machine), from Old French calandreur, from Medieval Latin calendra "cloth-pressing machine," so called from the shape of the machine used, from Latin cylindrus, from Greek kylindros "roll, cylinder" (see cylinder).

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mechanism (n.)

1660s, "the structure of a machine, engine, or other contrivance for controlling or utilizing natural forces," from Modern Latin mechanismus, from Greek mēkhanē "machine, instrument, device" (see machine (n.)). Sense of "a mechanical contrivance or agency of any kind" is from 1670s.

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debug (v.)

"remove the faults from," 1945, of machine systems, from de- + bug (n.) "glitch, defect in a machine." Meaning "to remove a concealed microphone" is from 1964. Related: Debugged; debugging.

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calender (v.)

"to pass through a calender," a machine which smooths and presses paper, cloth, etc., 1510s, from French calandre, the machine name, from Medieval Latin calendra (see calender (n.)).

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machinist (n.)

1706, "engineer, mechanical inventor, constructor of machines and engines," a hybrid from machine (n.) + -ist. Meaning "machine operator" is attested from 1879; in  U.S. Navy ratings, "an engine-room artificer or attendant," by 1880.

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machinator (n.)

"plotter, schemer. one who schemes with evil designs," 1610s, from Latin machinator, agent noun from past-participle stem of machinari "to design, contrive, plot," from machina "machine, engine; device, trick" (see machine (n.)).

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input (n.)

1753, "a sum (of cash) put in, a sharing, contribution," from verbal phrase; see in (adv.) + put (v.). Meaning "energy supplied to a device or machine" is from 1902, later of electronic devices; computing sense of "data fed into a machine" is from 1948, though this is perhaps from the verb in the computing sense.

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impeller (n.)

1680s, agent noun from impel (v.). As a machine part from 1836.

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