Etymology
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constitutional (n.)

"a constitutional walk," 1829, probably originally among university students, and probably short for constitutional walk or exercise; from constitutional (adj.) in the "beneficial to bodily health" sense.

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tardigrade (adj.)

1620s, "slow-going, slow-moving," from French tardigrade (17c.), from Latin tardigradus "slow-paced," from tardus "slow" (see tardy) + gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

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gravigrade (adj.)

"walking with heavy steps," 1839, probably via French, a modern scientific compound from Latin gravis "heavy" (from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy") + gradi "to walk" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

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gradation (n.)

1530s, "a climax;" 1670s, "orderly arrangement or succession," from French gradation (16c.) and directly from Latin gradationem (nominative gradatio) "ascent by steps; a climax," noun of action from gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Meaning "gradual change" is from 1540s.

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promenade (n.)

1560s, "a leisurely walk, a walk for pleasure or display," from French promenade "a walking, a public walk" (16c.), from se promener "go for a walk," from Late Latin prominare "to drive (animals) onward," from pro "forth" (see pro-) + minare "to drive (animals) with shouts," from minari "to threaten" (see menace (n.)).

Meaning "place for walking" is from 1640s; specifically "walkway by the sea" (from late 18c.); British sense of "music hall favored by 'loose women and the simpletons who run after them' " [The Observer, Jan. 18, 1863, in reference to the Alhambra in Leicester Square] is attested from 1863. Sense of "a dance given by or at a school" is from 1887.

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digitigrade (adj.)
Origin and meaning of digitigrade

"walking on the toes with the heel raised from the ground" (opposed to plantigrade), by 1819, from Modern Latin digitigradus, from digitus "toe" (see digit) + gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). As a noun, "a digitigrade mammal," by 1802.

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perp (n.)

1940s American English police jargon shortening of perpetrator (as in perp walk).

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degression (n.)

"a stepping down, descent" (obsolete), late 15c., from Latin degressionem (nominative degressio) "a going down," noun of action from past-participle stem of degredi "to go down, march down, descend," from de- "down" (see de-) + gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

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centigrade (adj.)

"consisting of 100 degrees, divided into 100 equal parts," 1799, from French, from centi- "hundred" (see centi-) + second element from Latin gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). The centigrade thermometer (see Celsius) divides the interval between the freezing and boiling points of water into 100 degrees.

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perambulation (n.)

mid-15c., perambulacioun, "a journey or tour of inspection," especially a walk around the borders of a property, parish, etc., to determine the boundaries, from Anglo-Latin (c. 1300) and Anglo-French perambulacion, from Medieval Latin perambulationem (nominative perambulatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin perambulare "to walk through, go through, ramble through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Meaning "act of passing or wandering through or over" is by late 15c.

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