Etymology
Advertisement
Antaeus 
Libyan giant slain by Herakles, from Latinized form of Greek Antaios, literally "opposite, opposed to, hostile," from anta "over against, face to face," related to anti "opposite, against" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before").
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
aflush (adv., adj.)
"blushing," 1880, from a- (1) + flush (n.) "redness in the face."
Related entries & more 
grimace (n.)
1650s, from French grimace (15c.) "grotesque face, ugly mug," possibly from Frankish or another Germanic source (compare Old Saxon grima "face mask," Old English grima "mask, helmet"), from the same root as grim (adj.). With pejorative suffix -azo (from Latin -aceus).
Related entries & more 
visage (n.)
c. 1300, from Anglo-French and Old French visage "face, coutenance; portrait," from vis "face, appearance," from Latin visus "a look, vision," from past participle stem of videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Visagiste "make-up artist" is recorded from 1958, from French.
Related entries & more 
surface (n.)
1610s, from French surface "an outermost boundary, outside part" (16c.), from Old French sur- "above" (see sur-) + face (see face (n.)). Patterned on Latin superficies "surface, upper side, top" (see superficial). As an adjective from 1660s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
confront (v.)

1560s, "to stand in front of, be facing," from French confronter (15c.), from Medieval Latin confrontare "assign limits to; adjoin," and confrontari "be contiguous to," from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together" (see con-) + frontem (nominative frons) "forehead" (see front (n.)).

Sense of "to face in defiance or hostility, stand in direct opposition to" is from 1580s. Transitive sense of "bring face to face" (with another, the evidence, etc.) is from 1620s. Related: Confronted; confronting.

Related entries & more 
features (n.)
"parts of the visible body" (especially the face), c. 1300, from feature (n.).
Related entries & more 
sudarium (n.)
"napkin for wiping the face," especially the cloth of St. Veronica, on which an image of Christ's face was believed to be imprinted, c. 1600, from Latin sudare "to sweat," from sudor "sweat" (see sweat (n.)). Earlier in nativized form sudary (mid-14c.).
Related entries & more 
grimace (v.)
1707, from French grimacer, from grimace "grotesque face" (see grimace (n.)). Related: Grimaced; grimacing.
Related entries & more 
deface (v.)
Origin and meaning of deface

mid-14c., "to obliterate" (writing); late 14c., "to mar the face or surface of," from Old French desfacier "mutilate, destroy, disfigure," from des- "away from" (see dis-) + Vulgar Latin *facia (see face (n.)). Weaker sense of "to mar, make ugly" is late 14c. in English. Related: Defaced; defacing.

Related entries & more 

Page 4