Etymology
Advertisement
extraverted (adj.)
in modern psychology, 1915, a variant of extroverted (see extrovert). Related: Extravert (n.), for which also see extrovert. There was a verb extravert in mid- to late 17c. meaning "to turn outward so as to be visible," from Latin extra "outward" + vertere "to turn."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mote (n.)

"small particle, as of dust visible in a ray of sunlight," Old English mot, of unknown origin; perhaps related to Dutch mot "dust from turf, sawdust, grit," Norwegian mutt "speck, mote, splinter, chip." Hence, anything very small. Many references are to Matthew vii.3.

Related entries & more 
trim (n.)
"state of being prepared," 1580s, nautical jargon, "fit for sailing," from trim (v.). From 1570s as "ornament, decoration;" the meaning "visible woodwork of a house" is recorded from 1884; sense of "ornamental additions to an automobile" is from 1922. Slang meaning "a woman regarded as a sex object" is attested from 1955, American English.
Related entries & more 
apparent (adj.)
late 14c., "indisputable, clearly understood;" c. 1400, "easily seen or perceived," from Old French aparant "evident, obvious, visible," from Latin apparentem (nominative apparens) "visible, manifest," present participle of apparere "appear, come in sight" (see appear).

First attested in phrases such as heir apparent (see heir). Meaning "superficial, spurious" is from c. 1400; that of "appearing to the senses or mind but not necessarily real" is from 1640s. Apparent magnitude in astronomy (how bright a heavenly body looks from earth, as opposed to absolute magnitude, which is how bright it really is) is attested from 1875. Middle English had noun forms apparence, apparency, but both are obsolete from 17c.
Related entries & more 
lucida (n.)
in astronomy, "star easily seen by the naked eye," also "brightest star in a constellation or group," 1727, from Modern Latin lucida (stella) "bright star," from fem. of Latin lucidus "light, bright, clear" (see lucid). Plural lucidae. Astronomy has used lucid for "visible to the naked eye" since 1690s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
extant (adj.)
1540s, "standing out above a surface," from Latin extantem (nominative extans), present participle of extare "stand out, be visible, exist," from ex "out" (see ex-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Sense of "in existence" attested in English by 1560s. Related: Extance; extancy, both 17c., both obsolete.
Related entries & more 
heliacal (adj.)

"pertaining to the sun" (but used especially of stars, in reference to their becoming visible out of the sun's glare), c. 1600, with -al (1) and Latinized form of Greek hēliakos "of the sun," from hēlios "sun" (from PIE root *sawel- "the sun"). The heliacal year (used in ancient Egypt) is reckoned from the heliacal rising of Sirius; thus it also is known as the canicular year. Related: Heliacally (1580s).

Related entries & more 
signal (n.)
late 14c., "visible sign, indication," from Old French signal, seignal "seal, imprint, sign, mark," from Medieval Latin signale "a signal," from Late Latin signalis (adj.) "used as a signal, pertaining to a sign," from Latin signum "identifying mark, sign" (see sign (n.)). Restricted sense "agreed-upon sign (to commence or desist, etc.) is from 1590s. Meaning "modulation of an electric current" is from 1855.
Related entries & more 
prompt (adj.)

early 15c., "ready, prepared (to do something), quick to act as occasion demands," from Old French prompt (13c.) and directly from Latin promptus "brought forth," hence "visible, apparent, evident, at hand," past-participle adjective from promere "to take or bring out or forth" (see prompt (v.)). Meaning "given or performed without delay" is from 1520s. Related: Promptly.

Related entries & more 
disappear (v.)

early 15c., disaperen, "cease to be visible, vanish from sight, be no longer seen," from dis- "do the opposite of" + appear. Earlier was disparish (early 15c.), from French disparaiss-, stem of desapparoistre (Modern French disparaître).

Transitive sense, "cause to disappear," is from 1897 in chemistry; by 1948 of inconvenient persons. Related: Disappeared; disappearing; disappears. Slang disappearing act "fact of absconding, action of getting away," is attested by 1884, probably originally a reference to magic shows.

Related entries & more 

Page 4