Etymology
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alembic (n.)
"distillation vessel used in old chemistry," late 14c., earlier limbeck (mid-14c.), from Old French alambic (13c.), via Old Spanish, from Arabic al-anbiq "distilling flask," via Persian, from Greek ambix "cup," a word of unknown, possibly Semitic, origin. Often spelled limbeck 15c.-17c. The al- is the Arabic definite article, "the."
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macule (n.)

"blemish, spot," late 15c., from Latin macula "a spot, stain" (see macula), perhaps via French macule. Compare macle.

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herpetic (adj.)
"pertaining to herpes," 1762, from Greek herpes (genitive herpetos); see herpes + -ic. Perhaps via French herpétique.
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idioticon (n.)
"a dictionary of a dialect," 1842, via German, from Latinized form of idiotikon, neuter of Greek idiotikos, from idioma (see idiom).
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autodidact (n.)
"self-taught person," 1746, probably via French, from Latinized form of Greek autodidaktos "self-taught" (see autodidactic).
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chard (n.)

"blanched leaf of artichoke," 1650s, from French carde "chard" (14c.), perhaps via Provençal, from Latin carduus "thistle, artichoke" (see cardoon).

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shuttle (v.)
1550s, "move rapidly to and fro," from shuttle (n.); sense of "transport via a shuttle service" is recorded from 1930. Related: Shuttled; shuttling.
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Johannine (adj.)
"of or pertaining to the Apostle John," 1839, perhaps via French, from Latin Joannes (see John) + -ine (1). Johannean is from 1842.
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insatiability (n.)
1650s, from Late Latin insatiabilitas, from Latin insatiabilis "not to be satisfied" (see insatiable). Possibly via French insatiabilité (16c.).
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bayou (n.)
"sluggish watercourse, outlet of a lake or river," 1766, American English, via Louisiana French, from Choctaw (Muskogean) bayuk "small stream."
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