Etymology
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aftward (adv.)

"toward the stern or back part of a vessel," Middle English afteward, from Old English æftewearde; see aft + -ward. The original form of afterward (q.v.), retained in nautical use. Related: Aftwards.

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phial (n.)

"vessel used for holding liquids," late 14c., from Medieval Latin phiola, from Latin phiala, from Greek phialē "flat vessel, dish, flat bowl for drinking or sacrificing," a loan-word of unknown origin. It also came to Middle English via Old French fiole "flask, phial" (12c.), hence the diversity of Middle English spellings (fiole,phiole,phial,fial,viole,vial,viele) and modern vial

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mainsail (n.)

also main-sail, in a square-rigged vessel, the sail bent to the main-yard, mid-15c., see main (adj.) + sail (n.).

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boiler (n.)

1540s, "person who boils," agent noun from boil (v.). The meaning "vessel for boiling" is from 1725; the specific sense of "strong metallic structure in which steam is generated for driving engines" is from 1757.

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can (n.)

generally, "a small cylindrical sheet-metal vessel used to contain liquids, preserves, etc.," Old English canne "a cup, container," from Proto-Germanic *kanna (source also of Old Saxon, Old Norse, Swedish kanna "a can, tankard, mug," also a unit of measure, Middle Dutch kanne, Dutch kan, Old High German channa, German Kanne). Probably it is an early borrowing from Late Latin canna "container, vessel," from Latin canna "reed," also "reed pipe, small boat;" but the sense evolution is difficult.

The modern sense of "air-tight vessel of tinned iron" is from 1867. The slang meaning "toilet" is c. 1900, said to be a shortening of piss-can; the meaning "buttocks" is from c. 1910, perhaps extended from this.

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brigantine (n.)

"small two-masted ship," 1520s, from French brigandin (15c.), from Italian brigantino, perhaps "skirmishing vessel, pirate ship," from brigante "skirmisher, pirate, brigand" from brigare "to fight" (see brigade and compare brigand).

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bunk (n.1)

1758, "sleeping-berth in a vessel," later in a railway car, etc., probably a shortened form of bunker (n.) in its sense of "seat." Bunk-bed (n.) attested by 1869.

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syncytial (adj.)

1895, "pertaining to a syncytium" (1877), Modern Latin, from Greek syn "together" (see syn-) + kytos "receptacle, vessel," used in biology for "cell" (see cyto-).

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tankard (n.)

late 14c., "large tub-like vessel," corresponding to Middle Dutch tanckaert, meaning the same thing, but both of unknown origin. A guess hazarded in OED is that it is a transposition of *kantard, from Latin cantharus. Klein suggests French tant quart "as much as a quarter." "The notion that the word is from tank 1 + -ard is wholly untenable" [Century Dictionary]. Meaning "drinking vessel" is first recorded late 15c.

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rib-band (n.)

also ribband, in ship-building, "long, flexible timber extending the length of the vessel body and nailed or bolted around the ribs to hold them in position," 1711, from rib (n.) + band (n.1).

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