Etymology
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mezzotint (n.)
1738; see mezzo + tint. As a verb, from 1827.
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telecast (n.)
1937, from television + broadcast (n.). The verb is recorded from 1940.
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onlooker (n.)

"spectator, one who observes but does not participate," c. 1600, from on + agent noun from look (v.). Old English had a verb onlocian, but the modern verb onlook (1867) appears to be a back-formation from onlooker.

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mun (v.)

an auxiliary verb in future indicative, now archaic or dialectal, "shall, will," late 12c., from Old Norse monu, a future tense auxiliary verb ultimately meaning "to intend," ultimately from the PIE root *men- (1) "to think."

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subtotal (n.)
1906, from sub- + total (n.). The verb is attested from 1916.
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smush 
1825 (n.), variant of mush. As a verb, by 1980.
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adulterate (v.)
"debase by mixing with foreign or inferior material, make corrupt," 1530s, back-formation from adulteration, or else from Latin adulteratus, past participle of adulterare "to falsify, corrupt," also "to commit adultery." Earlier verb was adulter (late 14c. in the sense "make impure"), directly from the Latin verb, but this English verb also carried the sense "commit adultery." Related: Adulterated; adulterating.
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wont (n.)
"habitual usage, custom," c. 1400, from wont, adjective and verb.
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spall (n.)
"chip of stone," mid-15c., from Middle English verb spald "to split open."
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reverb (n.)

1961, colloquial shortening of reverberation. Shakespeare uses it as a verb (Lear).

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