Etymology
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zillion (n.)

1942, arbitrary coinage with no definite numerical value; first recorded in Billboard magazine. Compare jillion, gazillion.

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maximal (adj.)

"of the highest or maximum value," 1872, from Latin maximus "greatest" (see maximum (n.)) + -al (1). Related: Maximally.

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extent (n.)

c. 1300, extente, "tax levied on value; value of property for taxation," from Anglo-French extente, estente "extent, extension;" in law, "valuation of land, stretch of land," from fem. past participle of Old French extendre "extend," from Latin extendere "to spread out, spread" (see extend). Meaning "degree to which something extends" is from 1590s.

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estimation (n.)
late 14c., "action of appraising; manner of judging; opinion," from Old French estimacion "evaluation, value; calculation, planning," from Latin aestimationem (nominative aestimatio) "a valuation," from past participle stem of aestimare "to value" (see esteem (v.)). Meaning "appreciation" is from 1520s. That of "process of forming an approximate notion" is from c. 1400.
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catchpenny (n.)

"something of little value but externally attractive and made to sell quickly," 1760, from catch (v.) + penny (n.). Also as an adjective.

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pringle (n.)

"small silver coin of about the value of a penny," formerly current in Scotland and northern England, 1680s, a word of unknown origin.

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appraise (v.)
c. 1400, "to set a value on," from stem of Old French aprisier "apraise, set a price on" (14c., Modern French apprécier), from Late Latin appretiare "value, estimate," from ad "to" (see ad-) + pretium "price" (see price (n.)). Original English spelling apprize altered by influence of praise. Related: Appraised; appraising.
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demonetize (v.)

"divest of standard monetary value," 1852, from French démonitiser, from de- (see de-) + monetiser (see monetize). Also demonetise. Related: Demonetized; demonetizing.

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appreciated (adj.)
1794, "enhanced in value;" by 1831 as "received with gratitude;" past-participle adjective from appreciate (v.).
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vilify (v.)
mid-15c., "to lower in worth or value," from Late Latin vilificare "to make cheap or base; to esteem of little value," from Latin vilis "cheap, base" (see vile) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Meaning "to slander, speak evil of" is first recorded 1590s. Related: Vilified, vilifying.
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