Etymology
Advertisement
ptosis (n.)

"a falling of or inability to raise the upper eyelid," 1743, from Greek ptōsis, literally "falling, a fall," also "the case of a noun," nominal derivative of piptein "to fall" (from PIE *pi-pt-, reduplicated form of root *pet- "to rush; to fly"). In English, especially of the eyelid. Related: Ptotic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cranium (n.)

the skull of a human being," "early 15c., craneum, from Medieval Latin cranium "skull," from Greek kranion "skull, upper part of the head," related to kara (poetic kras) "head," from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head." Strictly, the "brain-box," the bony case which encloses the brain. Englished by Sir Thomas Browne as crany.

Related entries & more 
choate (adj.)

"finished, complete," mistaken back-formation from inchoate (q.v.) as though that word contained in- "not." First attested 1878 in letter from Oliver Wendell Holmes lamenting barbarisms in legal case writing (he said he found choate in a California report).

Related entries & more 
axillary (adj.)

"pertaining to the armpit or shoulder," 1610s, from Latin *axillaris, from axilla "armpit, upper arm, underpart of an upper wing" (see axle).

Related entries & more 
staircase (n.)

also stair-case, 1620s, originally the enclosure of the stairs, from stair + case (n.2) in its sense "frame;" compare former window-case, door-case.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
minuscule (n.)

1705, "small (not capital) letter," from French minuscule (17c.), from Latin minuscula, in minuscula littera "slightly smaller letter," fem. of minusculus "rather less, rather small," diminutive of minus "less" (from PIE root *mei- (2) "small"). It refers to the kind of reduced alphabetical character which arose 7c. and was from about 9c. substituted in writing for the large uncial. From it the small or lower-case letters of the modern Latin alphabet were derived.

As an adjective, from 1727 in printing, "not capital, of reduced form, small" (of letters); the general sense of "extremely small" is attested by 1893. Related: Minuscular.

Related entries & more 
brachio- 

before a vowel, brachi-, word-forming element meaning "arm, of the upper arm, pertaining to the upper arm and," from Latinized form of Greek brakhion "arm," perhaps originally "upper arm," literally "shorter," from brakhys "short" (from PIE root *mregh-u- "short"), in contrast to the longer forearm.

Related entries & more 
tweezers (n.)

"small pincers, diminutive tongs," 1650s, extended from tweezes, plural of tweeze "case for tweezers" (1620s), a shortening of etweese, considered as plural of etwee (1610s) "a small case," from French étui "small case" (see etui). Sense transferred from the case to the implement inside it. For form, compare trousers from trouzes.

Related entries & more 
casing (n.)

1570s, "action of fitting with a case," verbal noun from case (v.). The meaning "a covering, an enclosure" is from 1839.

Related entries & more 

Page 4