Etymology
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hyper- 
word-forming element meaning "over, above, beyond," and often implying "exceedingly, to excess," from Greek hyper (prep. and adv.) "over, beyond, overmuch, above measure," from PIE root *uper "over."
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transitive (adj.)
"taking a direct object" (of verbs), 1570s (implied in transitively), from Late Latin transitivus (Priscian) "transitive," literally "passing over (to another person)," from transire "cross over, go over, pass over, hasten over, pass away," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Related: Transitively.
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overtrouble (v.)

also over-trouble, "to trouble excessively," 1580s, from over- + trouble (v.). Related: Overtroubled; overtroubling.

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overexcitement (n.)

also over-excitement, "excess of excitement," 1815, from over- + excitement.

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transit (n.)
Origin and meaning of transit
mid-15c., "act or fact of passing across or through," from Latin transitus "a going over, passing over, passage," verbal noun from past participle of transire "cross over, go over, pass over, hasten over, pass away," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Meaning "a transit of a planet across the sun" is from 1660s. Meaning "public transportation" is attested from 1873.
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overnice (adj.)

also over-nice, "fastidious," early 14c., from over- + nice (adj.).

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*uper 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "over."

It forms all or part of: hyper-; insuperable; over; over-; sirloin; somersault; soprano; soubrette; sovereign; sum; summit; super-; superable; superb; superior; supernal; supra-; supreme; sur-.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit upari, Avestan upairi "over, above, beyond;" Greek hyper, Latin super "above, over;" Old English ofer "over," German über, Gothic ufaro "over, across;" Gaulish ver-, Old Irish for.
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layover (n.)
also lay-over, "a stop overnight," 1873, from the verbal phrase; see lay (v.) + over (adv.). Earlier as "a cloth laid over a table-cloth" (1777). The verbal phrase is from 1530s as "to overlay."
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overcorrection (n.)

also over-correction, "an excessive or too frequent correction," 1828, from over- + correction.

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oversimplification (n.)

also over-simpification, "act or process of simplifying excessively," 1835, from over- + simplification.

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