Etymology
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prophylaxis (n.)

"preventive treatment of disease, a guarding against the attack of some disease," 1746, Modern Latin, from Greek prophylassein "to keep guard before," from pro "before" (see pro-) + phylassein "to watch over, guard" (see prophylactic).

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misuse (n.)

late 14c., "improper use, misapplication," from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + use (n.) and in part from Old French mesus "abuse, excess, misdeed." As "abuse, ill-treatment" it is attested from 1590s.

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medicable (adj.)

"admitting of medical treatment, curable, healable," 1610s, from Latin medicabilis "curable," from medicare, medicari "to medicate, heal, cure" (poetic and Late Latin) from medicus "physician, healing" (see medical (adj.)).

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patient (n.)

"suffering, injured, or sick person under medical treatment," late 14c., from Old French pacient (n.), from the adjective, from Latin patientem "suffering" (see patience). In Middle English also of anyone who suffered patiently.

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detox 

1972 as a verb, "subject (someone) with an addiction to detoxification," a colloquial abbreviation of detoxify; 1975 as a noun, "place for the treatment of alcoholics and drug addicts," a colloquial abbreviation of detoxification (center, facility, etc.).

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doctor (v.)

1590s, "to confer the degree of doctor on," from doctor (n.). Meaning "to treat as a doctor, administer medical treatment to" is from 1712; sense of "alter, disguise for the purpose of deception, falsify" is from 1774. Related: Doctored; doctoring.

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oculist (n.)

"eye doctor," 1610s, from French oculiste (16c.), from Latin oculus "an eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). Middle English had oculister (early 15c.) "an authority on the eye and treatment of eye diseases."

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orthodontia (n.)

"the branch of dentistry concerned with the treatment of irregularities of the teeth and jaws," 1849, from ortho- "straight, regular" + Greek odon (genitive odontos) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth") + abstract noun ending -ia.

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psychiatry (n.)

"the medical treatment of mental diseases," 1846, from French psychiatrie, from Medieval Latin psychiatria, literally "a healing of the soul," from Latinized form of Greek psykhē "mind" (see psyche) + iatreia "healing, care" (see -iatric).

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buff (v.)
"to polish, make attractive," 1849, from buff (n.1), either in reference to the treatment of buff leather or to the use of buff cloth to polish metals, etc., with a buff-wheel (1849) or a buff-stick (1850). Related: Buffed; buffing.
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