Etymology
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trattoria (n.)
"Italian restaurant," 1832, from Italian trattoria, from trattore "host, keeper of an eating house," from trattare "to treat," from Latin tractare, frequentative of trahere (past participle tractus) "to draw" (see tract (n.1)).
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s'mores 

snack treat, 1937, the plural of a childish contraction of some more, as in "Gimme some more of those." S'more as a contraction of some more is recorded by 1887.

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reverence (v.)

late 14c., reverencen, "treat (someone) with respect, honor; venerate, pay pious homage to; esteem, value; bow to (someone); do honor to," from reverence (n.). Related: Reverenced; reverencing.

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decontextualize (v.)

"study or treat something in isolation from its context," by 1971, from de- "do the opposite of" + contextualize "put into context" (see contextual). Related: Decontextualized; decontextualizing; decontextualization.

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violate (v.)
early 15c., "to break" (an oath, etc.), from Latin violatus, past participle of violare "treat with violence, dishonor, outrage" (see violation). Sense of "ravish" is first recorded mid-15c. Related: Violated; violating.
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bedevil (v.)
1768, "to treat diabolically, abuse," from be- + verbal use of devil (q.v.). Meaning "to mischievously confuse" is from 1755; that of "to drive frantic" is from 1823. Related: Bedeviled (1570s in a literal sense, "possessed"); bedeviling.
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caress (v.)
"bestow caresses upon, stroke or pat affectionately;" also "treat with fondness or kindness," 1650s, from French caresser, from Italian carezzare "to cherish," from carezza "endearment" (see caress (n.)). Related: Caressed; caressing.
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Ambien 
trade name for prescription medication Zolpidem, which is used to treat insomnia, registered 1993 in U.S., no doubt suggested by ambient or words like it in French.
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minimize (v.)

"reduce to a minimum, make as little or slight as possible," 1802, first recorded in Bentham; see minimum + -ize. As "to depreciate, treat slightingly," by 1875. Related: Minimized; minimizing.

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doctor (v.)

1590s, "to confer the degree of doctor on," from doctor (n.). Meaning "to treat as a doctor, administer medical treatment to" is from 1712; sense of "alter, disguise for the purpose of deception, falsify" is from 1774. Related: Doctored; doctoring.

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