Etymology
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missive (n.)

by c. 1500, "a written message sent by superior authority; a commandment," noun use of the adjective (mid-15c.) meaning "sent by superior authority" (in phrase lettres missives) from Medieval Latin missivus "for sending, sent," especially in littera missiva "letters sent," from Latin missus, past participle of mittere "to send" (see mission).

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puissance (n.)

early 15c., puissaunce, "power, strength, authority," from Old French puissance, poissance "power, might" (12c.), from puissant (see puissant).

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Michaelmas (n.)

early 12c., Sanct Micheles mæsse, the feast of the dedication of St. Michael the Archangel (Sept. 29), from Michael + mass (n.2). It was an English quarter day in the old business and university calendars. Goose is the day's traditional fare at least since 15c.

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fajitas (n.)

traditional Tex-Mex dish consisting of strips of meat, chopped vegetables, and cheese wrapped in a tortilla, by 1977, from Mexican Spanish fajita, literally "little strip, little belt," a diminutive of Spanish faja "strip, belt, wrapper," from Latin fascia "band" (see fasces).

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matrifocal (adj.)

1952, in reference to families or households where the mother has responsibility and authority, a term from sociology, from matri- + focal.

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myco- 

before vowels myc-, word-forming element meaning "mushroom, fungus," formed irregularly from Latinized form of Greek mykēs "fungus, mushroom, anything shaped like a mushroom," a word of uncertain origin (Beekes doubts the traditional explanation that connects it to the source of mucus). The correct form is myceto- (mycet-).

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insubordinate (adj.)

1792, on model of French insubordonné (1787); from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + subordinate (adj.) "submitting to authority." Related: Insubordinately.

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Corydon 

traditional poetic name for a shepherd or rustic swain, from Latin Corydon, from Greek Korydon, name of a shepherd in Theocritus and Virgil, from korydos "crested lark." Beekes writes that "The connection with [korys] 'helmet' may be correct, but only as a variant of the same Pre-Greek word."

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hegemon (n.)

1897, originally with reference to the position of Great Britain in the world, from Greek hēgemon "an authority, leader, sovereign" (see hegemony).

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antipasto (n.)

"small portions served from a shared platter as the traditional first course of a formal Italian meal," 1929, from Italian antipasto, from anti- "before" (from Latin ante; see ante-) + pasto "food," from Latin pascere "to feed," from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Earlier Englished as antepast "something taken before a meal to whet the appetite" (1580s).

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