Etymology
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Ambien 
trade name for prescription medication Zolpidem, which is used to treat insomnia, registered 1993 in U.S., no doubt suggested by ambient or words like it in French.
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bougie (n.)
1755, "wax candle," from French bougie "wax candle," from Bugia, Algeria, (Arabic Bijiyah), a town with a long-established wax trade. Earlier (1754) as a type of thin, flexible surgical instrument.
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occupational (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a particular occupation, calling, or trade," 1850, from occupation + -al (1). Occupational therapy is attested by 1918; occupational risk by 1951. Related: Occupationally.

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guinea (n.)
former British coin, 1660s, from Guinea, because the coins were first minted for British trade with Guinea (but soon in domestic use) and with gold from Africa. The original guinea was in use from 1663 to 1813.
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mercantilism (n.)

"a mercantile spirit or character; devotion (or excess devotion) to trade and commerce," 1834, from French mercantilisme; see mercantile + -ism. By 1881 as "the mercantile system." Related: Mercantilist; mercantilistic.

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Perspex 
1935, trade name in Britain for what in the U.S. is called Plexiglas or Lucite, irregularly formed from Latin perspect-, past participle stem of perspicere "look through, look closely at" (see perspective).
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lubritorium (n.)
"place where automobiles are greased," 1928; from lubrication + ending from auditorium. The -torium in the word was an overworked trade suffix in the late 1920s; Mencken lists also infantorium, shavatorium, restatorium, hatatorium, and odditorium ("a slide-show").
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Tylenol (n.)
introduced 1955 as the name of an elixir for children, trade name originally registered by McNeil Laboratories, Philadelphia, Pa., from elements abstracted from N-acetyl-para-aminophenol, the chemical name of its active compound.
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butchery (n.)
mid-15c., bocherie, "the trade of a butcher," from Old French bocherie "slaughter; a butcher's shop" (13c., Modern French boucherie), from bochier "a butcher" (see butcher (n.)). Meaning "barbarous killing" is from mid-15c.
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metier (n.)

"one's skill, talent, or calling," 1792, from French métier "trade, profession," from Old French mestier "task, affair, service, function, duty," from Gallo-Roman *misterium, from Latin ministerium "office, service," from minister "servant" (see minister (n.)).

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