Etymology
Advertisement
effleurage (n.)
"gentle rubbing with the palm of the hand," 1886, from French effleurage, from effleurer "to graze, touch lightly, touch upon, strip the leaves off," from ef- "out" (see ex-) + fleur as in the phrase à fleur de "on a level with," from German Flur "a plain, field, meadow" (see floor (n.)).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
contaminable (adj.)

"capable of being contaminated," 1847, from Late Latin contaminabilis, from Latin contaminare "to defile, to corrupt, to deteriorate by mingling," originally "to bring into contact," from contamen "contact; pollution," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + base of tangere "to touch" (from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle").

Related entries & more 
contagious (adj.)

late 14c., "contaminating or contaminated, containing contagion" (of air, water, etc.); "communicable" (of disease); also "morally corrupting," from Old French contagieus (Modern French contagieux) and directly from Late Latin contagiosus, from Latin contagio "a touching, contact," often in a bad sense, "a contact with something physically or morally unclean, contagion," from contingere "to touch," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tangere "to touch," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle." Figuratively applied to anything apt to spread from one to another (rumor, etc.) from 1650s. Related: Contagiously; contagiousness.

Related entries & more 
roughness (n.)

late 14c., roughnesse, "state or quality of being rough to the touch; hoarseness of voice," from rough (adj.) + -ness.

Related entries & more 
contaminate (v.)

early 15c., "infect with a disease, defile," from Latin contaminatus, past participle of contaminare "to defile, to corrupt, to deteriorate by mingling," originally "to bring into contact," from contamen "contact; pollution," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + *tag-, base of tangere "to touch" (from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle"). Related: Contaminant (1934).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
noli me tangere 
late 14c., "type of facial ulcer, lupus," Latin, literally "touch me not," from noli, imperative of nolle "to be unwilling" + me (see me) + tangere "to touch" (from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle"). Used over the years of various persons or things that must not be touched, especially "picture of Jesus as he appeared to Mary Magdalene" (1670s, see John xx.17) and "plant of the genus Impatiens" (1560s, so called because the ripe seed pods burst when touched).
Related entries & more 
palpation (n.)

"act of touching, feeling by the sense of touch," late 15c. (Caxton), from French palpation, from Latin palpationem (nominative palpatio) "a stroking; flattering, flattery," noun of action from past-participle stem of palpare "to touch" (see palpable). Used in English in literal sense.

Related entries & more 
tangible (adj.)

1580s, "capable of being touched," from French tangible and directly from Late Latin tangibilis "that may be touched," from Latin tangere "to touch," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle." Sense of "material" (as in tangible reward) is first recorded 1610s; that of "able to be realized or dealt with" is from 1709. Related: Tangibly.

Related entries & more 
integer (n.)

"a whole number" (as opposed to a fraction), 1570s, from noun use of Latin integer (adj.) "intact, whole, complete," figuratively, "untainted, upright," literally "untouched," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + root of tangere "to touch" (from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle"). The word was used earlier in English as an adjective in the Latin sense, "whole, entire" (c. 1500).

Related entries & more 
tag (n.2)

"children's game," 1738 (in reference to "Queen Mary's reign"), perhaps a variation of Scottish tig "touch, tap" (1721), probably an alteration of Middle English tek "touch, tap" (see tick (n.2)). Baseball sense is from 1912. It's not an acronym and doesn't stand for anything.

Related entries & more 

Page 4