Etymology
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Seattle 

city founded 1853, named for Seatlh (c. 1790-1866), native chief who befriended white settlers. His name is in the Salishan tongue.

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glottis (n.)

"mouth of the windpipe, opening at the top of the larynx," 1570s, from Greek glōttis "mouthpiece of a pipe," from glōtta, Attic dialect variant of glōssa "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)).

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Panglossian (adj.)

"optimistic" (usually ironic or disparaging), 1831, from French Panglosse, the name of the philosopher and tutor in Voltaire's "Candide" (1758), from pan- "all" (see pan-) + Greek glōssa, literally "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)).

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dental (adj.)

1590s, "of or pertaining to teeth," from French dental "of teeth" or Medieval Latin dentalis, from Latin dens (genitive dentis) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth"). As "connected with or used in dentistry," 1826. In grammar, "formed or pronounced at or near the front upper teeth, with the tip or front of the tongue," 1590s. As a noun, "sound formed by placing the end of the tongue against or near the upper teeth," 1794. Related: Dentally; dentality.

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radula (n.)

1753, a type of surgical instrument, from Latin radula "scraper, scraping iron," from radere "to scrape" (see raze (v.).  As "tongue or lingual ribbon of a mollusk," by 1853. Related: Radular.

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Salish (n.)

self-designation of the Native American people of Montana also known as Flathead, from a term containing -ish "people." The language group that includes their tongue has been called Salishan (1886).

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Madge 

fem. proper name, an assibilated form of Mag, pet form of Margaret. Also used as the name of a barn-owl and a magpie.

MADGE. The private parts of a woman. [Grose, "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," London, 1785]
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rantallion (n.)

"One whose scrotum is so relaxed as to be longer than his penis, i. e. whose shot pouch is longer than the barrel of his piece." ["Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," Grose, 1785]

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old hat (adj.)

"out of date," 1911, from old + hat. As a noun phrase, however, it had different sense previously. The "Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue" (1796) defines it as, "a woman's privities, because frequently felt."

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glossocomium (n.)

in medical use, "case for a broken limb," 1670s, from Latinized form of Greek glossocomion "small case for holding the reed of a wind instrument," from glōssa "mouthpiece," literally "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)).

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