Etymology
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Cuffy 

also Cuffee, a characteristic name among slaves, by 1713. Also sometimes in 19c. "a black bear."

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Orson 

masc. proper name, from French ourson, diminutive of ours "bear," from Latin ursus (see arctic).

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borne 

"carried, sustained, endured," past tense and participle of bear (v.) in all senses not related to birth. See born.

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Beowulf 

Old English beo wulf, literally "bee-wolf," "a wolf to bees;" a kenning for "bear." See bee (n.) + wolf (n.).

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endurance (n.)

late 15c., "continued existence in time;" see endure + -ance. Meaning "ability to bear suffering, etc." is from 1660s.

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fossiliferous (adj.)

by 1830, from fossil + -ferous "producing, containing," from Latin ferre "to bear, carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry").

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Foraminifera 

order of Protozoa furnished with a shell, 1835, Modern Latin, neuter plural of foraminifer "bearing holes," from Latin foramen "hole, opening, orifice" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole") + -fer "bearing," from ferre "to bear" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children"). So called because the shells usually are perforated by pores. Related: Foraminiferal.

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sware 

obsolete or archaic past tense of swear (v.), common 15c.-17c. by analogy of past tense of bear (v.).

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proliferation (n.)

1859, "formation or development of cells by budding or division," from French prolifération, from prolifère "producing offspring," from Latin proles "offspring" (see prolific) + ferre "to bear, carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children"). The meaning "enlargement, extension, increase in number" is from 1920; especially of nuclear weapons by 1960 in the jargon of the U.S. State Department.

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child-bearing (n.)

also childbearing, "bringing forth of a child, the action of producing children," late 14c., from child + verbal noun of bear (v.). As an adjective from late 14c.

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