Etymology
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timeous (adj.)
"timely," late 15c., from time (n.) + -ous. Related: Timeously.
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two-time (v.)
"to deceive, cheat, betray," 1924, perhaps from notion of "to have two at a time." An earlier reference (1922) in a Kentucky criminal case involves a double-cross or betrayal without a romance angle. Related: two-timing (adj.); two-timer.
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first-timer (n.)
"rookie, one doing something for the first time," 1888, from first time; see first (adj.) + time (n.).
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aforetime (adv.)
early 15c., "before the present, in the past," from afore + time (n.).
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short-timer (n.)
"one whose term or enlistment is about to expire," 1906, from short (adj.) + time (n.) + agent noun ending -er (1).
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longtime (adj.)
also long-time, 1580s, from long (adj.) + time (n.).
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suppertime (n.)
also supper-time, late 14c., from supper + time (n.).
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timeless (adj.)
"eternal," 1620s, from time (n.) + -less. Earlier it meant "ill-timed" (1550s). Related: Timelessly; timelessness.
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foretime (n.)
"a previous time," 1530s, from fore- + time (n.). Related: Foretimes.
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