Etymology
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depot (n.)

1795, "warehouse or storehouse for receiving goods for storage, sale, or transfer," from French dépôt "a deposit, place of deposit," from Old French depost "a deposit or pledge," from Latin depositum "a deposit," noun use of neuter past participle of deponere "lay aside, put down," from de "away" (see de-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

Military sense of "fort where stores, ammunition, etc. are deposited" is from 1798; meaning "railway station, building for accommodation and shelter of passengers and the receipt and transfer of freight" is attested by 1842, American English.

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depositor (n.)

1560s, "one who deposes" (obsolete in this sense); 1620s, "one who makes a deposit, one who places something in charge of another," agent noun in Latin form from deposit (v.).

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esker (n.)

"deposit left by a glacial stream," 1852, from Irish eiscir "ridge of gravel."

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deposition (n.)

late 14c., deposicion, "dethronement, a putting down of a person from dignity, office, or authority," from Old French deposicion (12c.), from Latin depositionem (nominative depositio), noun of action from past-participle stem of deponere "to lay aside" (see deposit (v.)).

Meaning "a statement or statements made in court under oath" is from early 15c. Meaning "action of depositing" is from 1590s. Properly, deposition belongs to deposit, but deposit and depose have become inextricably confused and English deposition partakes of senses belonging to both.

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payphone (n.)

also pay-phone, "telephone requiring a coin deposit to operate," 1906, from pay (v.) + phone (n.).

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pawnbroker (n.)

"one licensed to lend money at interest on pledge or deposit of goods," 1680s, from pawn (n.1) + broker (n.).

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pawn (v.)

"to give or deposit (something) as security" in exchange for the payment of money borrowed, etc., 1560s, from pawn (n.1). Related: Pawned; pawning.

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warehouse (v.)

1799, "deposit or secure in a warehouse," from warehouse (n.). In the colloquial sense, especially of mentally disabled persons, from 1972. Related: Warehoused; warehousing.

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varve (n.)

"annual deposit of silt in a lake bed," 1912, from Swedish varv "turn, layer," related to Old Norse hverfa, Old English hwerfan "to turn round" (see wharf).

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bank (v.1)

"to act as a banker," 1727, from bank (n.1). As "to deposit in a bank" from 1833. Figurative sense of "to rely on" (i.e. "to put money on") is from 1884, U.S. colloquial. Related: Banked; banking; bankable.

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