Etymology
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bel canto 
1894, Italian, literally "fine song." See belle + chant.
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shanty (n.2)
"sea song," 1867, alternative spelling of chanty (n.).
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doodah (n.)

"excitement," 1915, from refrain of the popular minstrel song "Camptown Races."

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sender (n.)
c. 1200, agent noun from send (v.). In 1930s slang, a popular musician or song. Sendee is recorded from 1806.
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epithalamium (n.)
"bridal song," 1590s (earlier in nativized form epithalamy, 1580s), from Latin epithalamium, from Greek epithalamion "a bridal song," noun use of adjective meaning "of or for a bridal, nuptial," from epi "at, upon" (see epi-) + thalamos "bridal chamber, inner chamber" (see thalamus). Related: Epithalamic.
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jim-dandy (n.)
"remarkable person or thing," 1844, perhaps from an old song, "Dandy Jim of Caroline" (1840s).
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evensong (n.)
the native word for vespers, Old English æfensang; see even (n.) + song.
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spiritual (n.)
"African-American religious song," 1866, from spiritual (adj.). Earlier "a spiritual thing" (1660s).
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hi-de-hi 

call-and-response exclamation in singing, by 1933, associated with U.S. bandleader Cabell "Cab" Calloway (1907-1994) and especially his signature song "Minnie the Moocher," which dates from 1931.

Calloway recalled in his autobiography that the song came first and the chorus was later improvised when he forgot the lyrics during a radio broadcast. ["Harlem Renaissance Lives," Oxford, 2009]
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ear-worm (n.)
1880, "boll-worm, corn parasite" (corn-ear-worm attested from 1855), from ear (n.2) + worm (n.). Also an old alternative name for "earwig" (from ear (n.1)); from 1881 as "secret counselor." From 1989 as "annoyingly unforgettable pop song or part of a song."
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