Etymology
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proceeds (n.)

"results, profits, sum derived from the sale of goods," 1660s (in singular form from 1640s), from proceed (v.) on the notion of "that which proceeds" or occurs from some possession or transaction.

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phenotype (n.)

"the sum total of the observable characteristics of an individual; type of organism distinguishable from others by observable features," 1911, from German phaenotypus (Wilhelm Johannsen, 1909); see pheno- + type (n.). Related: Phenotypic.

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inconsummate (adj.)
"unfinished, incomplete," 1640s, from Late Latin inconsummatus "unfinished," from in- "not" (see in- (1) + consummatus "perfected, complete," past participle of consummare "sum up, to complete" (see consummation).
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CD 

1979 as an abbreviation of compact disc as a digital system of information storage. By 1959 as an abbreviation of certificate of deposit "written statement from a bank acknowledging it has received a sum of money from the person named" (1819).

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solid (n.)
late 14c., "three-dimensional figure," from solid (adj.). Meaning "a solid substance" is from 1690s. Compare also solidus; Latin solidus (adj.) was used as a noun meaning "an entire sum; a solid body."
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genome (n.)
"sum total of genes in a set," 1930, genom, modeled on German genom, coined 1920 by German botanist Hans Winkler, from gen "gene" (see gene) + (chromos)om "chromosome" (see chromosome).
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payment (n.)

late 14c., paiement, "action of paying, repayment of a debt; amount due as a payment," from Old French paiement (13c.), from paiier (see pay (v.)). Meaning "thing or sum of money given in discharge of a debt" is from mid-15c.

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pharmacology (n.)

"the sum of scientific knowledge concerning drugs," 1721, formed in Modern Latin (1680s) from pharmaco- (see pharmacy) + -logy. It includes pharmacy (the art of preparing drugs) and also pharmacodynamics (what is known concerning their action). Related: Pharmacological.

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promissory (adj.)

mid-15c., promissorie, "conveying or containing a promise," from Medieval Latin promissorius, from Latin promissus, past participle of promittere (see promise (n.)). The legal promissory note, a signed document containing a written promise to pay a specified sum to certain persons, is recorded by 1670s.

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yield (n.)
Old English gield "payment, sum of money; service, offering, worship;" from the source of yield (v.). Extended sense of "production" (as of crops) is first attested mid-15c. Earliest English sense survives in financial "yield from investments."
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