Etymology
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gunman (n.)

1620s, from gun (n.) + man (n.). In early American English use, especially of Indian warriors.

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outgun (v.)

"to surpass in guns, have more firepower than," 1690s, from out- + gun. Related: Outgunned; outgunning.

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zip (n.1)

"sound of something moving rapidly," 1875, imitative. Zip gun "homemade pistol" is attested by 1950.

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handgun (n.)

mid-14c., of unmounted firearms, from hand (n.) + gun (n.). In modern use, "a pistol," from 1930s, American English.

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bushing (n.)

"metal sleeve fitted into a machine or hole," 1839, from gerundive of bush (n.) "metal lining of the axle hole of a wheel or touch hole of a gun" (1560s), which is from Middle Dutch busse "box" (cognate with the second element in blunderbuss). Bush-metal "hard brass, gun-metal" is attested from 1847.

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gunner (n.)

mid-14c., gonner "one who works a cannon, catapult, or mangonel," from gun (n.) + -er (1).

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pom-pom (n.)

"Maxim automatic gun," 1899, of imitative origin, soldiers' slang from the Boer War. For the ornamental tuft, see pompom.

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breech (v.)

late 15c., "put in breeches," from breeches. Meaning "fit a gun with a breech" is from 1757, from breech (n.). Related: Breeched; breeching.

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double-barreled (adj.)

1709, of a gun, "having two barrels;" see double (adj.) + barrel (n.). Figurative sense of "serving two purposes" is by 1777.

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fowl (v.)

Old English fuglian "to catch birds," from the source of fowl (n.). Related: Fowled; fowling. Fowling-piece "gun used for shooting wildfowl" is from 1590s.

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