Etymology
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solstice (n.)
mid-13c., from Old French solstice (13c.), from Latin solstitium "point at which the sun seems to stand still," especially the summer solstice, from sol "the sun" (from PIE root *sawel- "the sun") + past participle stem of sistere "stand still, take a stand; to set, place, cause to stand," from PIE *si-st-, reduplicated form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." In early use, Englished as sunstead (late Old English sunstede).
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subsist (v.)

1540s, "to exist;" c. 1600, "retain the existing state," from French subsister and directly from Latin subsistere "to stand still or firm, take a stand, take position; abide, hold out," from sub "under, up to" (see sub-) + sistere "to assume a standing position, stand still, remain; set, place, cause to stand still" (from PIE *si-st-, reduplicated form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Meaning "to support oneself" (in a certain way) is from 1640s. Related: Subsisted; subsisting.

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stater (n.)
ancient coin, late 14c., from Greek stater, from histanai "to fix, to place in a balance," hence "to weigh;" literally "to cause to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Once the name of a specific issue of coin, in ancient Greece it became a general name for the principal or standard coin in any place.
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stasis (n.)

"stoppage of circulation," 1745, from medical Latin, from Greek stasis "a standing still, a standing; the posture of standing; a position, a point of the compass; position, state, or condition of anything;" also "a party, a company, a sect," especially one for seditious purposes; related to statos "placed," verbal adjective of histēmi "cause to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

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desist (v.)

mid-15c., "refrain;" 1520s, "to stop, cease from some action or proceeding," from Latin desistere "to stand aside, leave off, cease," from de "off" (see de-) + sistere "stop, come to a stand," from PIE *si-st-, reduplicated form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Related: Desisted; desisting.

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standoffish (adj.)
1826, from verbal phrase stand off "hold aloof" (c. 1600); see stand (v.) + off (adv.). Related: Standoffishly; standoffishness.
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stare decisis (n.)

the legal doctrine of being bound by precedents, Latin, literally "to stand by things decided;" from stare "to stand" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Second element from decidere "to decide, determine," literally "to cut off," from de- "off" (see de-) + caedere "to cut" (see -cide).

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Anastasia 

fem. proper name, from fem. of Late Latin Anastasius, from Greek Anastasios, from anastasis "resurrection, a raising up of the dead;" literally "a setting up, a standing or rising up," from ana "up; again" (see ana-) + histanai "to cause to stand, to stand" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm").

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oust (v.)

early 15c., ousten, "eject, dispossess," from Anglo-French oster,ouster (early 14c.), Old French oster "remove, take away, take off; evict, dispel; liberate, release" (Modern French ôter), from Latin obstare "stand before, be opposite, stand opposite to, block," in Vulgar Latin, "hinder," from ob "against" (see ob-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Related: Ousted; ousting.

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Constantine 

masc. proper name, Latin Constantinus, from constans "standing firm, stable, steadfast, faithful," present participle of constare "to stand together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." With the common name-forming suffix -inus (see -ine (1)).

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