Etymology
Advertisement
ridicule (v.)

1680s, "make ridiculous" (a sense now obsolete); c. 1700, "treat with contemptuous merriment, make sport of, deride," from ridicule (n.) or else from French ridiculer, from ridicule. Chapman, for a verb, used ridiculize. Related: Ridiculed; ridiculing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
disport (n.)
Origin and meaning of disport

c. 1300, "activity that offers amusement, pleasure, or recreation," from Anglo-French disport, Old French desport, from disporter/desporter "divert, amuse" (see disport (v.)). From late 14c. as "a sport or game; the game of love, flirtation."

Related entries & more 
illude (v.)
early 15c., "to trick, deceive; treat with scorn or mockery," from Latin illudere "to make sport of, scoff at, mock, jeer at," from assimilated form of in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous).
Related entries & more 
romp (v.)

1709, "to play rudely and boisterously, sport, frolic," perhaps a variant of ramp (v.); but also see romp (n.). Meaning "to win (a contest) with great ease" is attested by 1888, in early use often in horse-racing. Related: Romped; romping.

Related entries & more 
gambol (v.)

"skip about in sport," 1580s; earlier gambade (c. 1500), from French gambader, from gambade (see gambol (n.)). Compare Middle English gambon "a ham" (see gammon); English dialectal gammerel "small of the leg;" gamble "a leg." Related: Gamboled; gamboling; gambolling.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
merrythought (n.)

"wishbone of a fowl's breast," c. 1600, from merry (adj.) + thought. So called from the sport of breaking it between two persons pulling each on an end to determine who will get a wish he made for the occasion (the winner getting the longer fragment). Also see wishbone.

Related entries & more 
judo (n.)
1889, from Japanese judo, literally "gentle way," from ju "softness, gentleness" (from Chinese jou "soft, gentle") + do "way, art," from Chinese tao "way." "A refined form of ju-jitsu introduced in 1882 by Dr. Jigoro Kano, using principles of movement and balance, and practiced as a sport or form of physical exercise" [OED]. Related: Judoist.
Related entries & more 
queueing (n.)

"act or fact of standing in line," 1918, verbal noun from queue (v.).

"Queueing" had really become an equivalent for sport with some working-class women. It afforded an occasion and an opportunity for gossip. ["The War of Food in Britain," in The Congregationalist and Advance, April 25, 1918]
Related entries & more 
potshot (n.)

also pot-shot, 1836, "shot taken at animal simply to 'get it in the pot,' " that is, not for sport or marksmanship and with little heed paid to the preservation of the animal; from pot (n.1) + shot (n.). Extended sense of "piece of opportunistic criticism" first recorded 1926. Compare pot-hunter. Earlier as an adjective it meant "drunk" (17c.).

Related entries & more 
handball (n.)
also hand-ball, mid-15c., "small ball, thrown or batted by hand," also the name of a game, from hand (n.) + ball (n.1). Originally a throwing and catching game popular before the use of bats or rackets. The modern sport of that name seems to be so called by 1885.
Related entries & more 

Page 4