Etymology
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select (adj.)

1560s, "chosen on account of special excellence or fitness," from Latin selectus, past participle of seligere "choose out, single out, select; separate, cull," from se- "apart" (see se-) + legere "to gather, select" (from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather").

"Carefully picked," hence "choice, of special excellence" (by 1580s). Related: Selectly; selectness. The noun meaning "a selected person or thing, that which is choice" is recorded from c. 1600.

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coaching (n.)

1825, "the use of a coach as a public conveyance;" 1849 as "special instruction or training for an exam or an athletic contest;" verbal noun from coach (v.). 

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sett (n.)

see set (n.1).

The extra t is an arbitrary addition in various technical senses, from a lawn-tennis to a granite set. Each class of persons has doubtless added it to distinguish the special sense that means most to it from all others ; but so many are the special senses that the distinction is now no more distinctive than an Esq. after a man's name, & all would do well to discard it. [Fowler]
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semiotics (n.)

1660s, in medicine, "branch of pathology concerned with the body's symptoms;" from semiotic; also see -ics. The meaning "study or doctrine of signs and symbols with special regard to function and origin" is by 1880. 

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stirpes (n.)

plural of stirps, Latin, literally "stem, stalk, trunk of a plant," figuratively "scion, offspring, descendant; source, origin, foundation, beginning," a word of uncertain origin. Hence stirpiculture "breeding of special stocks or strains."

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nonce-word (n.)

"word coined for a special occasion," and not likely to be wanted again, 1884, from nonce "for a particular purpose" + word (n.). Said to be a translation of Littré's term mot d'occasion.

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casuistry (n.)

1703, in ethics, "the solution of special problems of conscience by application of general principles or theories;" see casuist + -ry. Even in the earliest printed uses the sense was pejorative.

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novena (n.)

in Catholicism, "devotions consisting of special prayers or services on nine successive days," 1745, from Medieval Latin novena, fem. of Latin novenus "ninefold," from novem "nine" (see nine). 

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jimmy (n.)
"burglar's crowbar," 1848, variant of jemmy, name for a type of crowbar much used by burglars, special use of Jemmy, familiar form of proper name James (compare the mechanical uses of jack (n.)).
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pupa (n.)

"post-larval stage of a metamorphosizing insect," 1773, a special use by Linnæus (1758) of Latin pupa "girl, doll, puppet" (see pupil (n.1)) on notion of "undeveloped creature." Related: Pupal; pupiform.

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