Etymology
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aikido (n.)
Japanese art of self-defense, 1936, literally "way of adapting the spirit," from Japanese ai "together" (from au "to harmonize") + ki "spirit" + do "way, art," from Chinese tao "way."
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Canadianism (n.)
"national spirit of Canadians," 1875, from Canadian + -ism.
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grim (n.)
"spectre, bogey, haunting spirit," 1620s, from grim (adj.).
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Ahura Mazda 
from Avestan ahura- "spirit, lord," from Indo-Iranian *asuras, from suffixed form of PIE root *ansu- "spirit" (see Aesir) + Avestan mazda- "wise," from PIE *mens-dhe- "to set the mind" (from root *men- (1) "to think" + root *dhe- "to set, put").
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kobold (n.)
German earth-elemental or nature spirit, 1830; see cobalt.
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metropolitanism (n.)

"metropolitan spirit, ideas, or institutions," 1855, from metropolitan (adj.) + -ism.

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pneuma (n.)

a word used in English in various sense from late 19c. ("breath;" "spirit;" "soul;" "a breathing;" also as a technical term), from Greek pneuma "a blowing, a wind, blast; breeze; influence; breathed air, breath; odor, scent; spirit of a person; inspiration, a spirit, ghost," from pnein "to blow, to breathe," from PIE root *pneu- "to breathe," of imitative origin (compare Greek pnoe "breath," pnoia "breathing;" Old English fnora "sneezing," fnæran "to snort").

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genius (n.)

late 14c., "tutelary or moral spirit" who guides and governs an individual through life, from Latin genius "guardian deity or spirit which watches over each person from birth; spirit, incarnation; wit, talent;" also "prophetic skill; the male spirit of a gens," originally "generative power" (or "inborn nature"), from PIE *gen(e)-yo-, from root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups.

The sense of "characteristic disposition" of a person is from 1580s. The meaning "person of natural intelligence or talent" and that of "exalted natural mental ability, skill in the synthesis of knowledge derived from perception" are attested by 1640s.

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mettlesome (adj.)

"full of spirit, fiery, courageous," 1660s, from mettle + -some (1). Related: Mettlesomely; mettlesomeness.

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disembodied (adj.)

"divested of a body, free from flesh," of a soul or spirit, "separated from a body," 1742, past-participle adjective from disembody.

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