Etymology
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No results were found for sphex. Showing results for speed.
fartlek (n.)
1952, Swedish, from fart "speed" (cognate with Old Norse fara "to go, move;" see fare (v.)) + lek "play" (cognate with Old Norse leika "play;" see lark (v.)).
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tempo (n.)
"relative speed of a piece of music," 1724, from Italian tempo, literally "time" (plural tempi), from Latin tempus "time, season, portion of time" (see temporal). Extended (non-musical) senses by 1898.
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overdrive (n.)

"speed-increasing gear in an automobile," 1929, from over- + drive (n.). Earlier it was a transitive verb, "to drive too hard, work to exhaustion," Old English oferdrifan.

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career (v.)
1590s, "to charge at a tournament," from career (n.). The meaning "move rapidly, run at full speed" (1640s) is from the image of a horse "passing a career" on the jousting field, etc. Related: Careered; careering.
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clip (n.2)

mid-15c., clips, "shears," from clip (v.1). Meaning "act of clipping" is from 1825, originally of sheep-shearing, later of haircuts. Meaning "rate of speed" is 1867 (compare clipper). Meaning "an extract from a movie" is from 1958.

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dispatch (n.)

1540s, "dismissal after settlement of business," from dispatch (v.). Meaning "speed, haste" is from 1570s. Sense of "a written message sent speedily" is first attested 1580s; that of "a sending off or away" is from c. 1600.

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baud (n.)
1932, originally a unit of speed in telegraphy, coined in French in 1929 in honor of French inventor and engineer Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903), who designed a telegraph printing system.
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accelerator (n.)
1610s, "a hastener," from Latin accelerator, agent noun from accelerare "to hasten; make haste" (see accelerate). Motor vehicle sense of "pedal which operates the throttle and thus modulates engine speed" is from 1900; particle physics sense is from 1931.
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broadband (n.)
from 1620s in various senses, from broad (adj.) + band (n.1). In electronics from 1956 as "a band having a wide range of frequencies;" as a type of high-speed internet access, it was widely available from 2006.
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hyperdrive (n.)
by 1951, an invented word used by science fiction writers to describe anything that can power a space craft faster than the speed of light, contra Einstein. From drive (n.) with the first element perhaps abstracted from hyperspace.
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